Local News Archives for 2019-04

FLASH FLOOD WARNING TILL 7:30pm APRIL 30th

Flash Flood Warning
National Weather Service Quad Cities IA/IL
131 PM CDT Tue Apr 30 2019

The National Weather Service in the Quad Cities has issued a

* Flash Flood Warning for...
  Central Bureau County in north central Illinois...

* Until 730 PM CDT Tuesday.

* At 129 PM CDT, Doppler radar indicated heavy rain across the warned
  area. Flash flooding is expected to begin shortly.

Additional rainfall amounts of around 1 inch is likely in the warned
area.

This includes the following highways...
 Interstate 80 in Illinois between mile markers 50 and 73.
 Interstate 180 between mile markers 7 and 13.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Turn around, don`t drown when encountering flooded roads. Most flood
deaths occur in vehicles.

Excessive runoff from heavy rainfall will cause flooding of small
creeks and streams, country roads, farmland, and other low lying
spots.

Goetz re-elected chair of IVCC board

Jane Goetz of Ottawa was re-elected chair at a special reorganizational meeting of the Illinois Valley Community College board of trustees Monday.

 

Trustees also re-elected Vice Chair Everett Solon of Streator and elected Secretary Angela Stevenson of Ottawa. Board attorney Walter J. Zukowski, Treasurer Cheryl Roelfsema and Secretary to the Board Judy Day were all reappointed.

 

Goetz made the following committee appointments: herself as the Illinois Community College Trustees Association representative and Jay McCracken of Hennepin as alternate; closed session minutes: Stevenson chair, Amy Boyles of Ottawa and David Mallery of Hennepin; facilities: Mallery chair, Stevenson and Melissa Olivero of Peru; audit-finance: Solon chair, McCracken and Olivero; and planning: McCracken chair, Solon and Boyles.

 

Totals from the canvass of the April 2 election were Goetz 14,307 and Boyles 12,272; both were elected to six-year terms.

 

In other action, the board voted to keep meeting times at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of each month.

 

History of Baseball Program at Bishop Hill

Dr. Bruce Storey, Director of Educational Services at Black Hawk College, will be presenting a scholarly program about the History of Baseball at the Dairy Building, located at 410 North Erickson Street in Bishop Hill, IL.   America’s pastime began in 1850.  This presentation will look at baseball from its beginning to the present.  How has baseball impacted U.S. history? How has the game evolved? What were the biggest disputes, the greatest teams, and the best players of the various eras?

 

Find out by attending this free program on Saturday May 11 at 2 p.m.  The History of Baseball is sponsored by the Bishop Hill Heritage Association and the Black Hawk College Speakers Bureau.  For more details, please call 309 927-3899, email bhha@mymctc.net, or visit www.bishophillheritage.org.

 

Transfer Academy open house May 8

Illinois Valley Community College will host an open house for its new Transfer Academy at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 8, at its Ottawa Center, 321 W. Main St.

 

The event features a brief presentation, ‘Q & A’ with Academy leaders, optional registration, take-home material and refreshments.

 

Transfer Academy is focused on dual-credit junior and senior high school students released in the afternoon to attend classes at Ottawa Center or on main campus. Dual credit allows students to earn college and high school credit simultaneously.

 

“Transfer Academy at Ottawa Center and on main campus will provide students the opportunity to start a robust college curriculum while in high school,” said Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs Bonnie Campbell.

 

Ottawa Center Transfer Academy courses are directed toward students pursuing studies in humanities, social sciences and those undecided on majors.

 

STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) courses – along with humanities and social sciences courses – will be offered at the main campus Transfer Academy.

 

Academy students receive a 25 percent tuition discount and those qualifying for the federal Free and Reduced Lunch program will pay just the $5 registration fee.  

 

RSVP for the open house at (815) 224-0800 or at www.ivcc.edu/events.

 

SENATE WEEK IN REVIEW: April 22-26, 2019

With the second half of the spring legislative session scheduled to begin April 30, a number of bills have been approved by the Senate so far, including legislation to help prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, fund pediatric cancer awareness, and ensure Illinois schools receive property tax money committed to them.

Preventing Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

The Senate recently passed a bill aimed at preventing Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) by putting stricter requirements in place following an investigation of a sudden and unexpected death of a child.

Senate Bill 1568 would require coroners to conduct an autopsy following the investigation, as well as list any environmental factors that may have contributed to the child’s death.  The bill would also require the Department of Public Health to publish current data that it receives from coroner reports so that the public has access to reporting concerning SIDS.

Supporters of the bill say that often, even in situations where there are unsafe factors present at the scene where the infant passed, the death is often ruled as SIDS without further investigation.  In situations like this, valuable information that could help prevent infant deaths in the future isn’t being gathered.

Illinois resident Ashley Lamps inspired this legislation and now runs a foundation that advocates for SIDS awareness and the use of safe sleep practices.  To learn more, visit the Aden Lamps Foundation website.

Senate Bill 1568 now heads to the House of Representatives for consideration.

Pediatric cancer research

To increase funding for pediatric cancer research, the Senate passed legislation on April 11 that would authorize the Illinois Department of Human Services to issue a decal for pediatric cancer awareness.

Senate Bill 946 would create the decals, which would have an original issuance fee of $25; with $10 to the awareness fund and $15 to the Secretary of State Special License Plate Fund.  The renewal fee would be $25 with $23 to the fund and $2 to the Secretary of State Special License Plate Fund.

The legislation was inspired by a Jersey County family’s struggle with pediatric cancer.  Jonny Wade was diagnosed at age seven and passed away in 2015 after bravely battling the disease for nearly a year.  His family has continued to advocate for further research in Jonny’s memory.

Senate Bill 946 is currently awaiting further consideration in the House of Representatives.

Ensure schools, taxing districts receive property tax money

Legislation to ensure Illinois schools receive all of the property tax money committed to them through the tax extension process was passed by the Senate on April 12.

Senate Bill 1043 seeks to address the concern that school districts, and other taxing bodies, are losing funding due to refunds issued by county treasurer’s offices for Certificates of Errors and appeal adjustments, both of which are out of the control of the taxing district.

The reduction in a taxing district’s expected levy revenue is a result of the cancellations and abatements administered by the state and county offices.  These adjustments, made after a taxing body’s levy is approved and the tax bills are sent, are preventing taxing districts, such as schools, from receiving 100 percent of their publicly approved levy extensions.

Senate Bill 1043 is currently awaiting further consideration in the House of Representatives.

Illinois Monarch Conservation Action Plan

On April 22, celebrated as Earth Day, a coalition of Illinois agencies revealed the Illinois Monarch Project, an Agriculture Action Plan to preserve Monarch butterflies.  They also unveiled a new pollinator habitat near the Illinois Department of Agriculture building at the Illinois State Fairgrounds.

Monarch butterflies are important because they help pollinate plants that produce fruit and other foods.  More information about the Illinois Monarch Project is available at www.ilagformonarchs.org.


Principal Malahy named Golden Apple winner

 

The Weaver Team presented a Senate Certificate of Recognition on April 24 to Principal Susan Malahy of Lindbergh Middle School in Peoria. 

 

Principal Malahay is a 2019 Golden Apple winner –  one of eight in the state, and the only downstate recipient. 

 

She was nominated by Dr. Jerry Bell of Peoria District 150. The award also came with a “scholarship” for her and her school.

The Golden Apple Award for Excellence in Leadership honors exemplary performance in school leadership by a principal or head of school who has had a significant and sustained positive impact on the school, created a culture of inclusivity, and delivered dramatic student growth.

 

Celebrating Eric Turner as he retires

What an honor to celebrate our friend Eric Turner as he is retiring after 24 years of serving on the Peoria City Council.

 

On April 25, the community gathered to pay tribute to his many years of community service.

I first got to see Eric in action in the late 1980s when he served on the Board of the Youth Farm. He has continued his involvement with good causes ever since, and his many contributions to Peoria would fill a book.

 

It’s an honor and a privilege to wish Councilman Eric Turner all the best in his retirement!

 

Weaver Team visits with ICC students

 

Our Weaver Team recently had the opportunity to visit with students in Professor Joe Chianakas’ Communications class at Illinois Central College in East Peoria. I had a blast doing a mock interview with three of the students. They are all good thinkers and will do well.

The students talked with us about the issues of the day, and their insights and perspectives are unique and impressive. What a great feeling to watch these young people continue to develop into our future leaders, with the help of the faculty, staff and administrators at ICC.

 

MARK YOUR CALENDAR: Recycle Fair is May 11!

 

The Weaver Team is joining with Kuusakoski Recycling to host a community recycling event May 11 in Peoria.

The Recycle Fair is scheduled from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. at 2022 West Townline Road in Peoria.

Items that will be accepted for recycling include electronics, computers, VCRs, DVD players, televisions (limit two per car), printers, ink cartridges, and cell phones.

However, the event cannot accept microwaves, appliances or batteries.

For more information, call 309-693-4921.

Three 45-year Awards Highlight IVCH Recognition Dinner

Fifty-two Illinois Valley Community Hospital employees—including three nurses who have each worked at IVCH for 45 years—were honored at the hospital’s annual service awards dinner Thursday night (April 26) at Senica’s Oak Ridge Golf Club, LaSalle.

 

The 45-year honorees were Carol Myer of LaSalle, a nurse at the IVCH Peru Medical Clinic; Nancy Postula of Utica, a nurse with the IVCH ENT and Allergy Center; and Deb Redd of LaSalle, the hospital’s diabetes wellness coordinator.

 

Ultrasound technologist Cynthia Schlesinger of Earlville received a 40-year award.

 

Thirty-five year awards went to Diagnostic Imaging Director Cynthia Herrmann of Spring Valley and EKG/Cardiac Rehabilitation Supervisor Vicki O’Brien-Martin of Peru.

 

The awards presentation was preceded by remarks from Tommy Hobbs, IVCH chief executive officer, and Jim Loveland, president of the hospital’s board of directors, who each complimented the employees for their hard work and dedication.

 

Illinois Extension provides workshop on the Creative Economy

On Thursday, May 16, 2019 from 6:00 pm to 7:30 pm, the University of Illinois Extension in collaboration with the City of LaSalle and the Canal Corridor Association will offer a workshop for entrepreneurs, community leaders and economic development professionals. The program will be presented by Pam Schallhorn, a Community & Economic Development Educator for Illinois Extension at the University of Illinois Extension—Education Center & Community Teaching Kitchen, 944 First Street, LaSalle, IL.  

 

Developing a Creative Economy workshop was designed for those interested in tapping into the creative talent in their communities to build viable creative enterprises by developing a culture that appreciates and supports the creative sector.  Creative entrepreneurs include artists, designers (all types), musicians, boutique retailers, specialty food producers and others. The program also offers ways to start-up and fund creative enterprises. Examples include microbreweries, pop-up shops, co-businesses, art co-ops, outdoor markets, music festivals and internet cafes.  All of which have been shown to be the ‘third spaces’ needed to attract young adults back to a community.

 

“The City of La Salle and its Historic Downtown District continues to grow and thrive each day. New businesses and developers continue to have interest in what the City of La Salle has to offer. We are excited to partner with U of I Extension to promote, encourage, and educate new entrepreneurs and small business in our community” -– Katherine Koyak, Economic Development Director, City of La Salle.

 

Pam Schallhorn lived and worked in LaSalle and the surrounding area.  In 2001, she proposed in collaboration with the Canal Corridor Association the development of an historic district in downtown LaSalle.  “I am excited to be invited to present in LaSalle and to have the opportunity

to see all of the great things the area has been doing.”  Pam has been an Educator with Illinois

Extension since 2014 and her teaching and research interests include the creative sector economy; entrepreneurial development; downtown redevelopment; and reversing the outmigration of youth from rural communities.

                                        

“The Canal Corridor Association is pleased to see the redevelopment of historic downtown LaSalle in the last eleven years since we invested in bringing visitors to the I&M Canal Visitor Center and Canal Boat and look forward to being part of the next chapter for this important canal town,” - Ana B. Koval, President of the Canal Corridor Association.

 

"University of Illinois Extension is excited to bring community and economic development educational programs to the Illinois Valley area. Extension has resources and programs in leadership development, community planning, building entrepreneurial communities and more. We hope you can join us on May 16 to learn more from Pam on expanding local opportunities!”- Jill Guynn, County Director, University of Illinois Extension – Bureau, LaSalle, Marshall, Putnam Unit.

 

The cost of the workshop is $20.00 and reservations must be received before May 15th.  Register now at https://go.illinois.edu/Economy or for more information call the University of Illinois Extension office at 815-224-0889.  If you need a reasonable accommodation, please indicate when registering. Early requests are strongly encouraged to allow sufficient time for meeting your access needs.

 

The Mission of University of Illinois Extension is to provide practical education you can trust to help people, businesses and communities solve problems, develop skills and build a better future. University of Illinois Extension provides equal opportunities in programs and employment. Visit our website at http://web.extension.illinois.edu/blmp/

 

 

May 7 and 11 events at the Princeton Public Library

The Princeton Public Library will be offering two programs designed to help with your retirement investing and Medicare planning. On Tuesday, May 7 at 6:30 p.m. Chirs Cyr from Cyr Financial will reveal some myths and uncover the facts of how to invest and retire with peace of mind. Then, on Saturday, May 11 at 10:00 a.m. Tim Burgess from Physicians Mutual will discuss and educate participants on the ins and outs of Medicare, including how to make the most of your rights, options, and entitlements.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Author Heinz-Dietrick Suppan at the Princeton Public Library May 9

On Thursday, May 9 at 6:30 p.m. at the Princeton Public Library, author Heinz-Dietrich Suppan will discuss the journey detailed in his book The Ottawa Rescue Case which tells the story of a runaway slave’s trip to freedom. The book will be sold after his presentation

 

Follow Jim Gray, a runaway slave from Missouri, as he is arrested in southern Illinois and travels to Ottawa to stand trial. Learn how he later escapes with the help of anti-slavery Ottawa residents and travels on the Underground Railroad north up to Michigan and his final destination of Canada.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Changes to Public Computer Usage at the Princeton Public Library

Effective immediately, using the public computers at the Princeton Public Library will be even easier than before. Non-patrons requesting computer access will no longer need to show a photo ID to receive a guest login pass. Simply ask for a pass from the librarians at the front desk. All patrons with a Princeton Library card, including anyone who has a late fee on their account, may log in using the number on their card.

 

As a reminder, persons over the age of 16, unless accompanied by minors, must use the eight computers located near the front desk. Unattended children 16 or younger are limited to using the computers found in the Youth Services area. All work entered on the computer is inaccessible once the user has ended their computer session, and is deleted off all computers at the end of each day.

 

Internet filtering software is not used on computers in the adult section, but users should note that it is a violation of federal law to expose questionable material to anyone (especially minors) who does not wish to be exposed to it. The library does provide filtered access for children age 16 and under, but due to the limitations of current technology, blocking inappropriate material cannot be guaranteed.

IVCC offers Food Service Sanitation Course at Ottawa Center

 Illinois Valley Community College’s Continuing Education Office is offering “Food Service Sanitation” (CEU-1503-635) from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays, May 6-16 at Ottawa Center, 321 W. Main St.

 

The Applied Food Service Sanitation course is designed to assist the manager or potential manager in applying sanitation principles in food service establishments. During the session, students will take the national ServSafe Food Protection Manager Certification exam.

 

The class is required in Illinois for food service manager certification and is accepted by the Illinois Department of Public Health. Upon successful completion of the course, students will attain a national license that is valid in Illinois for five years.

 

Cost is $129. Required textbook is: ServSafe Manager, 7th Edition and is available at the IVCC Bookstore online at www.ivccbookstore.com. Due to the fast-paced nature of the class, students should purchase the book in advance and begin review prior to class.

 

To register, call (815) 224-0447.

 

IVCC Jazz Ensemble Concert May 7

The IVCC Jazz Ensemble will be in concert at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 7 in the Dr. Mary Margaret Weeg Cultural Centre.

 

Directed by Brandon Czubachowski, the concert features many jazz standards performed by students and community members. This event is free and open to the public.

 

IVCC Project Success Leadership Team and Nina's Market raises money for Cystic Fibrosis

Illinois Valley Community College’s Project Success Leadership Team recently raised awareness and donations for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.  

 

Along with the support of Nina’s Market and Taqueria, the community came out for an evening of dining and shopping which raised over $800. The IVCC Project Success Leadership Team raised donations on campus bringing the final total to $1,100.

 

The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation will allocate this money to local research and support care centers in central Illinois to help others like Rebecca Moreno, a survivor of cystic fibrosis who underwent a double lung transplant one year ago.

 

Freedom House Offers Empowerment Program for Incoming 4th – 9th Grade Students

The annual Empowerment Program for incoming grades 4-9 students, a series of one-day conferences presented by Freedom House, will be offered free of charge this June at eight locations in Bureau, Henry, Marshall, Putnam, and Stark Counties. This year’s theme is “Embracing Myself for All that I am Worth.”

 

For students entering grades 4-6, the program provides them with the tools to strengthen self-esteem, set goals, and acknowledge boundaries. The program for incoming 7-9 graders includes combatting negative self-talk, practicing self-compassion, respecting myself, becoming assertive, surviving conflict, and implementing healthy relationship dynamics.

Information about the conferences will be distributed to schools and sent home with students. For online registration, please visit www.freedomhouseillinois.org or www.facebook.com/freedomhouseillinois. The registration deadline is May 31.

 

For more information please e-mail: srosalez@freedomhouseillinois.com, or call (815-872-0087).

 

Schedule (8:30 am - 3:30 pm unless otherwise noted)

Princeton – Tuesday, June 4 – Bureau County Farm Bureau

Wyoming – Thursday, June 6 – WyHi Community Center

Geneseo – Monday, June 10 – Geneseo Public Library (9:30am - 4:00pm)

Spring Valley – Thursday, June 13 – Hall High School

Henry – Tuesday, June 18 – Marshall/Putnam County Farm Bureau

Granville – Thursday, June 20 – Putnam County HS, (8:15am-2:30pm)

Sheffield – Tuesday, June 25 – Cornerstone Community Wellness

Kewanee – Thursday, June 27 – Hill Church

IVCC Employee Recognition Event Honorees

Gerilynn Smith of Wenona received Illinois Valley Community College’s 2019 Connie Skerston Memorial Award for Support Staff Distinguished Service, Mary Black of Oglesby received the Stephen Charry Memorial Award for Teaching Excellence and Craig Castaneda received the Outstanding Part-time Faculty Member Award at IVCC’s 23rd Annual Employee Recognition Event at Grand Bear Lodge recently.  

 

    Other nominees for the distinguished support staff award were Ida Brown, Financial Aid and Veterans Benefits advisor and Crystal Credi, Student Services administrative assistant.

Smith, who is the administrative assistant for Facilities, was nominated by Business Services and Finance administrative assistant, Jan Full who said, “Gerilynn always has a smile on her face. She is also a friend to both newcomers and experienced staff. She has a welcoming attitude at work which makes a co-worker feel a part of the team,” she added.

 

Smith has over five years of experience with IVCC in the Facilities department where she maintains day-to-day office operations in addition to scheduling events and ensuring proper set-up. She’s served on numerous committees and teams.

 

Black, developmental mathematics laboratory instructor, is the college’s first instructor to win both the part-time teaching award (2010) and the top award for tenured faculty. Other nominees for the Charry award were Keith King, biology; Willard Mott, agriculture; Bob Reese, marketing and Jeff Spanbauer, history and anthropology.

 

The student who nominated Black for the award said, “Mrs. Black helped me stay on track and supported me in every way possible when I got behind.”

 

Over a 20-year career at IVCC, Black has taught pre-algebra, basic & intermediate algebra, geometry and technical math and was instrumental in helping initiate the successful “Fast Track to College Math” program.

 

Castaneda, now in his 13th year as a part-time anatomy & physiology instructor, is renowned for his ability to make highly complex material clear and understandable.

 

The student who nominated him for the award said he encouraged her to persevere when she was about to drop his course because of a recent knee surgery. She successfully completed the course. Castaneda’s full-time position as a physical therapist in a local hospital strengthens his classroom and lab instruction, the student said.

 

Trisha Blood, professional tutor in IVCC’s Peer Tutoring center was also nominated for the award.

 

The event also recognized Heather Knoblauch, Amber Knowlton, Tammy Landgraf, Mott and Andrew Seeger for earning tenure and employees for milestone years of service.

Honored for five years of service were: Deborah Anderson, Candice Chaffee, Heather Crawley, Bradley Fritz, D. Scott Johnson, Tracy Lee, Susan Martyn, Julie Milota, Leonard Newell, Erin Polte, Kathryn Ross, Robyn Schiffman and Kristopher Sienza.

 

Ten years: Ruben Alvarado, Frank Borkowsky, Timothy Freed, Kimberly Koehler, Melissa McCarthy, Rosemary McGinnis, Marlene Moshage, Nora Villarreal, Robert Vogl, Dawn Watson and Reed Wilson.

 

Fifteen years: Carmen Colon, Patricia Furlan, Wendi Harmon, Julie Hogue, Marilyn Lange, Susan Monroe, Janna Stash, Frances Whaley, Greg Whightsil and Karen Zeilman.

Twenty years: Black, Michael Bokus, Vincent Brolley, Ida Brown, Jennifer Bubb, Theresa Carranco, Lori Cinotte, Paula Hallock, Linda McCabe Pinn, Mark Quincer, Cheryl Roelfsema, Karen Stachowiak, Michelle Story, Brian Towne, Thomas Tunnell, Walter Waligora and Dawn Wiggins.

 

Twenty-five years: Valery Calvetti, James Gibson and Cory Tomasson. 

   

Thirty years: Arthur Koudelka, Pamela Mammano, Dennis O’Shea, Sheryl Popurella

 

German and English instructor James Michael was recognized for fifty years of service.

 

Retirees honored include: Kathryn Baker, Jean Batson-Turner, Lori Carey, Lorri Foockle, Paul Leadingham, Linda McCabe Pinn, Edna McManus, Michael Minnick, D. Gene Montgomery, Michael Skoflanc and Patricia Williamson

 

4-H Horse Bowl and Hippology Results 2019

Bureau County 4-H Horse Bowl and Hippology members competed at the Northwest Regional 4-H Horse Bowl and Hippology Contest on Saturday, April 6 at Knoxville High School.  Placing at the event were Junior Hippology members Payton Frueh (7th) and Brinley Kloepping (9th), Junior Horse Bowl member Beth Rachel Freeman(4th), and Junior Horse Bowl Team, consisting of  Brinley Kloepping, Payton Frueh, Kendall Forth, Sierra Spohn, and Beth Rachel Freeman placed 3rd.  Horse Bowl and Hippology members are coached by Christina Christensen.

 

In 4-H, learning about horses means much more than learning to ride. Through 4-H, young people with a passion for horses can participate in educational contests related to the equine industry regardless of whether they even own a horse. These educational programs enhance members’ knowledge of horse health, breed characteristics, management, and feeding.

The primary objective of these contests is to provide an opportunity for youth to demonstrate their knowledge of equine-related subject matter in a competitive setting where attitudes of friendliness and fairness prevail.

 

For more information on 4-H, call University of Illinois Extension – Bureau, LaSalle, Marshall, Putnam Unit Office at 815-875-2878. Extension offices are located in Princeton, Ottawa, Henry and in Oglesby on the IVCC campus.

 

The Mission of University of Illinois Extension is to provide practical education you can trust to help people, businesses and communities solve problems, develop skills and build a better future. University of Illinois Extension provides equal opportunities in programs and employment. Visit our website at http://web.extension.illinois.edu/blmp/

 

Staffing Changes - FCC Transfer of Control - Community Partnerships

On February 1, 2019 Regional Media took over the operation of Princeton’s WZOE-AM 1490, WZOE-FM 98.1, and WRVY-FM 100.5 awaiting the approval from the Federal Communications Division. The transition from the Samet family to Regional Media has been granted and the transaction has been consummated.

 

Regional Media Princeton has also extensively renewed its commitment to the area’s small business community. With today's announcement, Tom Clark, former GM of the group is no longer employed or affiliated with the group. Regional Media Vice President James Jones says, “Through immense feedback and a firm focus on rebuilding the group for the small business community, and the listeners we serve, we at Regional Media continue to push for substantial reinvention”

 

Changes thus far have included, WZOE-AM 1490 redeveloped as PrincetonNewsNow WZOE Newstalk 1490AM. Programming features expanded localized and agriculture programming and extensive local guest appearances. WZOE also features the top syndicated talk show hosts in the nation, all while establishing a first-class news and community operation in Princeton and the surrounding markets.  With its addition of PrincetonNewsNow.com, Regional Media Princeton is able to respond quickly to the area news and happenings, while allowing for users to immediately obtain the information.

 

Additionally, each noon hour is now home to Princeton’s edition of the LocalSportsNow.com local sports talk show. Sam Woolsey, and longtime Princeton favorite Norm Vandermoon host as they discuss the ins and outs of local sports and their take on what's happening nationally as well.

 

Z98 (98.1 WZOE-FM) has been completely overhauled with a completely new music lineup and morning show. Z98 is now Adult Contemporary, The At-Work Variety Format and has experienced immense growth in listenership. Additionally, WRVY has been completely overhauled as Dam Country, 100.5 WRVY serving a large area of Illinois from Princeton to Peoria. Dam Country 100.5 WRVY features all of country music’s legends mixed with agriculture news and weather. Regional Media Princeton has also used its longstanding relationship with Accuweather to provide the area’s most extensive local and severe weather coverage for Regional Media Princeton listeners and readers alike.

 

Regional Media Princeton’s Operations Manager Sam Woolsey said,” Since I moved to the area, the community has embraced me with open arms. I will continue to work diligently to provide a superior product for the community!’ Sam and his team continue to provide extensive coverage for the community. Some events have included, extensive local election coverage, including live interviews of all candidates, numerous events including “salute to agriculture”, and streaming of news events important to the community. Sam and his team visit regularly with mayors, emergency responders, city managers, local event managers, and community partners.

 

“It has been amazing seeing the commitment that our advertisers, and listeners are showing us. We will continue to deliver at a high level for them as we they are the most integral part of our operation.” says Regional Media President and CEO Fletcher M. Ford

 

Regional Media is completing renovations of the broadcast facility located on S. Main St in Princeton. Plans are underway that include new state of the art studios for all three stations, a completely renovated interior, and a redesign of the outside of the building.

 

*The leadership team of Regional Media Princeton includes Fletcher M. Ford President and CEO, Senior Vice President Jason Gilbraith, along with local Vice President James Jones and Operations Manager Sam Woolsey.

Record Release Tour Coming to Bishop Hill

Nebraska based songwriter, Evan Bartels will make a stop on a tour to release his latest record “Promised Land” on Sunday, April 28th at 7PM at Bishop Hill Creative Commons, located at 309 N. Bishop Hill St, Bishop Hill, IL. He will be joined by country artist Angela Meyer.

 

Evan Bartels has continued to learn and collect stories following the release of his 2017 debut album, The Devil, God, & Me. His experiences of touring throughout the United States and becoming a father have enhanced his perspective and widened his lens of the world. The past two years of his life have offered deeper insight and empathy toward the struggles of the human experience, and he clearly expresses this in his poignant and personal songwriting.

 

Storytelling has always been a fixture in his writing, and Bartels continues to evolve his narratives by digging deeper beneath the surface and clinging to an authentic message. He captures a moment and fleshes it out to its barest, rawest form, thereby creating a piece of art that—regardless of genre or setting—moves the listener. Bartels’s most current work embodies this action and directly reflects his mission to convey truthful narratives.

 

2019 will see the release of a new five-song EP: Promised Land. Divergent from his previous work, this release marks a transition into a new artistic phase and applies his aforementioned understanding of the world. Promised Land is a collection of songs centered on the art of breaking down one’s belief systems, habits, personality, and rebuilding a new person. Bartels says, “These songs are love songs. They’re about loving myself enough to question everything I am and being willing to break myself down to my core so that I can find who I can be if I’m at my best. They’re love songs to my wife and son, and in them there’s a promise of giving everything of myself to them. I wanted to capture a transition in my life in a way that I believe other people can look at themselves and find common ground through vulnerability.”

 

This EP launches Bartels onto a new stage. After having music featured on comedian Theo Von’s hit podcast, This Past Weekend, Bartels has found a global audience. Von said of Bartels, “I hear it all in his voice, sometimes people have that special gift and you can hear the whole world in them… there’s a lot of beautiful music out there but that boy’s got something in him. In his voice I can hear it all…I can see the whole timeline of everything. Sometimes that’s the gift of music, a voice and some lyrics come along and put it together for me. He did it.”

 

Evan Bartels isn’t holding back. With a full tour schedule, the release of his Promised Land EP, and a new full-length LP on the way, 2019 looks to be a promising year. During a time when we’re all looking for something to believe in, Bartels is preaching a much-needed gospel: live a life that doesn’t shy away from difficulty, but rather uses every aspect of the journey, its joys, and sorrows, to grow into the best version of ourselves.

 

The show will begin with a potluck dinner at 6PM, with music starting at 7PM, and is open to guests of all ages. A $10-20 donation is suggested. Reservations can be made on Eventbrite.com.

 

To make reservations and for more information please visit bishophillcommons.com.

 

To learn more about Evan Bartels please visit evanbartels.com.

 

To learn more about Angela Meyer please visit angelameyer23.com.

Acoustic Pop Songwriter to Perform in Bishop Hill

Fort Worth, Texas based pop songwriter, Andrew Sullivan will perform on Friday, April 26th at 7PM at Bishop Hill Creative Commons, located at 309 N. Bishop Hill St, Bishop Hill, IL.

 

The show will begin with a potluck dinner at 6PM, with music starting at 7PM, and is open to guests of all ages. A $10-20 donation is suggested.

 

To make reservations and for more information please visit bishophillcommons.com.

 

To learn more about Andrew Sullivan please visit andrewsullivanmusic.com.

 

Perry to Assume Ownership of In-Home Care VNA June 14, 2019

April 22, 2019 Perry Memorial Hospital announces it will be assuming ownership of In-Home Care VNA. The Home Health Change of Ownership Licensure Application has been submitted to the Illinois Department of Public Health and the services will be offered as Perry Home Care starting June 14.

 

The Perry Team welcomes the addition of professional At-Home Health Care as it will provide supportive care centered on the patient and family to improve the quality and coordination of nursing care and the patients’ quality of life at home.

 

Annette Schnabel, President/CEO Perry Memorial Hospital said, “Perry continues to grow our services. Perry Home Care providing home health aligns with the Perry Mission to provide compassionate, quality health services to the people and communities we serve."

 

Homebound residents in Bureau, Putnam, Marshall, LaSalle, Lee and Stark counties will have access to cost-effective, physician-supervised attention through an individualized nursing care program to meet their health needs including physical, occupational, and speech therapy. 

 

Perry Memorial Hospital is an active healthcare organization identifying ways to support the care continuum to deliver an excellent quality Perry Experience when receiving Perry care in the hospital and beginning June 14, in your home.

Organizational Meeting April 29th

The Illinois Valley Community College board will hold its organizational meeting at 5 p.m. Monday, April 29 in the boardroom, C307, to approve results of the April 2 election.

 

The board will elect a chair, vice chair and secretary along with appointing an attorney, treasurer of District 513 and Secretary of the Board. Meeting dates will be selected and committee appointments made.

 

There will be a closed session to discuss pending litigation and collective negotiations.

 

Bureau County 4-H Donates Easter Baskets

Twenty-six Bureau County families in need of assistance received a complete Easter meal and treats for children thanks to the community service efforts of 4-H Federation, with the support of Bureau County 4-H community clubs.  Community clubs donated 16 complete baskets. Federation members used funds earned from their primary fundraising event, the food stand at the Bureau County Fair, to shop for items to fill ten additional baskets and purchased hams for all 26 baskets.    

 

4-H Federation is a group of 4-H members from 8-12th grade whose primary purpose is to assist the University of Illinois Extension’s 4-H staff with planning and carrying out events and activities throughout the county.  They serve as mentors to younger members and help make the county program stronger. The youth members serve as communication links between 4-H community clubs and the Extension staff.  

 

For more information about 4-H programs, please contact Danielle Saletzki, 4-H and Youth Development Program Coordinator, at 815-875-2878 or by email des85@illinois.edu.

 

The Mission of University of Illinois Extension is to provide practical education you can trust to help people, businesses and communities solve problems, develop skills and build a better future. Visit our website at http://web.extension.illinois.edu/blmp/

 

If you have questions or need more information please call University of Illinois Extension, Bureau-LaSalle-Marshall-Putnam Unit at (815)875-2878. Extension offices are located in Princeton, Ottawa, Henry and in Oglesby on the IVCC campus.

 

Judge Hettel Keynotes May 18th IVCC Commencement

La Salle County Circuit Judge Joseph P. Hettel, an Illinois Valley Community College graduate, will deliver the college’s keynote address at its 53rd annual commencement at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, May 18 in the gymnasium.

 

A native of Ottawa, Judge Hettel graduated from Marquette High School. In 1987, he earned an associate’s degree from IVCC and was a National Junior College Athletic Association Honorable Mention All-American linebacker.

 

After earning the juris doctorate from Chicago Kent College of Law, he began his legal career as an Assistant La Salle County State’s Attorney in 1994, was elected State’s Attorney in 2000 and re-elected in 2004.

 

In 2006, the Illinois Supreme Court appointed Hettel Resident Circuit Judge of the 13th Judicial Circuit, LaSalle County. He ran unopposed in 2008 and was retained in 2014.

He resides in rural Ottawa with his wife, Leah, and their three children.

 

About 200 students are expected to walk at the commencement ceremony including some of the 158 summer 2018 graduates, 165 fall graduates, 379 projected spring graduates and 82 projected summer 2019 graduates.

 

Also at commencement:

 

  • Clayton Zelenik of Princeton will read his winning Paul Simon Student Essay;

  • IVCC’s Wind Ensemble will be conducted by Gene Montgomery for the final time as he is retiring after the performance;

  • President Jerry Corcoran will welcome graduates and confer certificates and degrees;

  • Vice President for Academic Affairs Deborah Anderson will present the Class of 2019;

  • 2018-19 student trustee Joseph Marenda of Spring Valley will present the invocation; and

  • 2019-20 student trustee Matthew Klein of Peru will present the benediction.

SENATE WEEK IN REVIEW: April 15-19, 2019

State lawmakers are working back in their districts until April 30, when they return to Springfield to finish the spring legislative session, which is scheduled to adjourn May 31.

So far this legislative session, several measures sponsored by Senate Republicans have advanced to the House of Representatives after receiving approval from the Senate, including a bill that increases awareness of Scott’s Law.

 

To promote on-the-job safety for Illinois State Troopers, the Senate has passed legislation that would require the Secretary of State to include information about Scott’s Law with every vehicle registration notice it sends to motorists. 

 

Senate Bill 947 is an effort to make Illinois’ roadways safer by informing drivers about Scott’s Law, which states that drivers must move over, if possible, and slow down when approaching an emergency vehicle stopped along the roadway.

 

The legislation is a response to the recent tragic deaths of three Illinois State Troopers who have been hit in accidents while their cars have been stopped along the roadway. The number of Troopers hit by vehicles has drastically increased in 2019, with 16 reported incidents in the past three months. In 2018, eight troopers were hit; 12 were hit in 2017; and five in 2016.

Scott’s Law, enacted in 2002, is named after Lieutenant Scott Gillen of the Chicago Fire Department, who was struck and killed by an intoxicated driver while assisting at a crash on the Dan Ryan Expressway.

 

A person who violates Scott’s Law can be fined up to $10,000.

 

COWL’s $2,500 scholarship program for women

 

The Conference of Women Legislators (COWL) is encouraging Illinois women who are seeking to earn undergraduate college degrees, to apply for one of their $2,500 scholarships. Applicants must be ages 25 or older.

 

COWL is a bipartisan, bicameral, nonprofit organization of women legislators in the Illinois General Assembly. The group’s yearly Scholarship Award Program is a part of its mission to promote economic independence, community service, and leadership development.

Scholarship applicants are required to enroll in an Illinois accredited college or university for a minimum of six credit hours to qualify, making the scholarships available to part-time and online students.

 

Applications must be postmarked or emailed by April 30. Awardees will be notified by May 31.

More information and application materials can be found at https://cowlil.com/programs/.

IEMA tips for disaster recovery

 

April is Recovery Preparedness Month, and IEMA has released a guide to help residents be prepared to quickly and efficiently recover from weather-related disasters like recent flooding at levels many northwestern Illinois communities have not seen in decades.

Here are five tips from IEMA:

 

  • Get Organized. Secure and organize financial and critical personal, household, and medical information. Having these items in a safe place can expedite insurance claims and other emergency expenses. 
  • Savings. Having some money saved is the best financial defense against disasters. Saving a little bit at a time can go a long way. A “rainy day” fund can help you invest in your family’s safety. 
  • Insurance. Obtain property (homeowners or renters), health, and life insurance if you do not have them.  
  • Inventory. Make an inventory of your possessions using photographs and/or videos of your belongings. 
  • Communication. Develop a Family Communication Plan that outlines how you will contact one another when a disaster strikes. 

University of Illinois Extension Plans Agriculture Careers Camp on Saturday, June 1st

Careers in Agriculture make up one of the largest industries and sources of long-term employment in the country, providing jobs for millions of Americans.  Biochemists, biophysicists, veterinarians and environmental engineers are just some of the jobs in the industry that employs nearly 23% of Illinois workers. To that end, University of Illinois Extension is proud to offer youth this agriculture careers exploratory experience on the campus of Black Hawk College East. The camp will take place on Saturday, June 1st from 9 am – 3:30 pm.  “The camp will be a great opportunity for teens and youth ages 12 - 18 years of age to plan their future career pathways by learning about a wide variety of careers in agriculture and talking with college instructors and industry professionals.,” said Jennifer Peterson, 4-H Educator with University of Illinois Extension.

 

Participants will be divided into groups by age and will get to attend interactive sessions led by Black Hawk College instructors and professionals in ag mechanics, animal science, agronomy, and engineering. "Our goal is that the campers will have a fun day learning about options available to them, exploring careers, visiting a local college, and meeting other teens with similar interests.," said Peterson, adding, “By having the camp at Black Hawk College East campus they will get to have a sense of what it feels like to go to college.” The sessions will take place in the Agriculture Center, Mechanics Lab, and Veterinary Sciences Center.   

 

Free bus transportation to Black Hawk College East in Galva, IL will be provided from the University of Illinois Extension offices in Milan, IL and Aledo, IL. Participants will check into the camp at 9 a.m., take two morning sessions, have a pizza party lunch and an afternoon session. The $10 fee includes lunch, t-shirt, snacks and activities (fee waivers are available for those in need.) Support for this camp is provided by CHS, the Illinois 4-H Foundation and Tyson Foods.

 

Sign up by May 22, session sizes are limited, so be sure to register early to reserve your spot. You can register online at U of I Extension's website: https://web.extension.illinois.edu/registration/?RegistrationID=20263 or call your county Extension office at (815) 875-2878 in Princeton, IL.

 

The Mission of University of Illinois Extension is to provide practical education you can trust to help people, businesses and communities solve problems, develop skills and build a better future. Visit our website at http://web.extension.illinois.edu/blmp/

If you have questions or need more information please call University of Illinois Extension, Bureau-LaSalle-Marshall-Putnam Unit at (815)875-2878. Extension offices are located in Princeton, Ottawa, Henry and in Oglesby on the IVCC campus.

 

MAY CALENDAR AT THE PRINCEON PUBLIC LIBRARY

Wed. May 1, 2019

6:30 p.m. Chicks with Sticks

Thurs.  May 2, 2019

6:30 p.m. Barry Cloud Music Program on Burl Ives

Sat. May 4, 2019

12:30 p.m. Wellness Workshop

Mon. May 6, 2019

6:30 p.m.  Monday Night Movie: True story of the Depression-era racehorse whose victories lifted the spirits of the nation.

Tues. May 7, 2019

10:30 a.m. Preschool Storytime and Craft

Tues. May 7, 2019

6:30 p.m. The Retirement and Investment University: educational & Informative presentation about investing for retirement presented by Christian Cyr from Cyr Financial.

Wed. May 8, 2019

1:00 p.m. I-Phone Camera Workshop

6:30 p.m. Widmark Wednesday

Thurs. May 9, 2019

6:30 p.m. Ottawa Rescue of 1859: Historic program by Heinz Suppan  about a runaway slave from 1859 who went through Ottawa, IL on his way to Canada.

Fri. May 10, 2019

4:00 p.m. K-3rd Grade Storytime

Sat. May 11, 2019

10:00 a.m. Medicare Supplement Information presented by Tim Burgess from Physicians Mutual

Mon. May 13, 2019

6:30 p.m. Monday Night Movie: The story of a bride-to-be trying to find her real father told using hit songs by the popular 1970s group ABBA.

Tues. May 14, 2019

10:30 a.m. Preschool Storytime and Craft

6:30 p.m. Quilts of Valor

Mon. May 20, 2019

6:30 p.m.  Monday Night Movie: An unlikely World War II platoon is tasked to rescue art masterpieces from Nazi thieves.

Tues. May 21, 2019

10:30 a.m. Preschool Storytime and Craft

6:30 p.m. U of I Extension program: “Backyard Birds” presented by Robert Chinn, Master Naturalist

Thurs. May 23, 2019

6:30 p.m. Princeton Rock Painters – Advanced signup is requested

Sat. May 25, 2019

10:00-3:00 p.m. Tractor Show:  Co-Sponsored by the Indian Valley Antique Club

Mon. May 27, 2019

CLOSED ALL DAY FOR MEMORIAL DAY

Tues. May 28, 2019

10:30 a.m. Preschool Storytime and Craft

6:30 p.m. Music Jam

 

Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois Annual Meeting to Honor Gold Award Girl Scouts, Volunteers, Girls, and Community Partners

Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois will host its Annual Meeting on Saturday, April 27, at Kishwaukee College in Malta, Illinois, from 9:30 a.m.–12 p.m. The event will honor the remarkable achievements of 16 local girls who have earned the highest award in Girl Scouts—the Girl Scout Gold Award.

 

The organization will present National Girl Scout Recognition Awards to local volunteers, including Volunteer of Excellence, Appreciation Pin, Honor Pin, President’s Award, Thanks Badge, Thanks Badge II, along with GSNI’s Hall of Fame Award. Community Partner Awards will be presented to Fraternal Order of the Eagles Club (FOE Club #679), Rockford IceHogs, and Roy Wilmering Scout Cabin. Local Girl Scout service units will also be lauded for accomplishments in Girl Scout membership and entrepreneurship program success!  

 

The event will include celebration of those local girls who have received Girl Scout scholarships and local troops that have achieved Honor Troop status within their communities. Girl Scout Membership pins will be presented from 5 years to 80 years. Graduating Girl Scouts are slated to close out the meeting in a Forever Green Bridging Ceremony where they will “cross the bridge” into adult Girl Scout membership.

 

New and returning board members for the organization will also be officially elected and rededicated to the Girl Scout Mission of building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. For more information, email customercare@girlscoutsni.org, call 844-GSNI-4-ME, or visit www.girlscoutsni.org.

 

GSNI 10th Anniversary: Rooted in History. Rising into the Future.

 

Backed by over 100 years of proven Girl Scout experience, four Girl Scout councils joined hands in 2009 and promised to propel girl leadership into the future together! In 2019, Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois will mark ten vibrant years of putting girls first at the center of all we do—from all-girl fun and adventure to unprecedented leadership opportunities found nowhere else. We have kept our promise to girls, and we always will!

 

Join us as we celebrate with lively family and girl events in local communities where it all began! Be part of our 10th Anniversary events and earn our special 10th Anniversary fun patch—Water, Land, Air! Girl Scouts Go Everywhere!

 

GSNI’s 10th Anniversary events include Over the Edge 4 Girl Scouts and Air Fair at Pheasant Run Resort in St. Charles, on June 1, 2019; the 15th Annual Thin Mint Sprint and Finish Line Fun at Harlem High School in Machesney Park, on September 21, 2019, and the 2nd Annual All-Girl and Family Fishing Derby and Water Whimsy at Rock Cut State Park in Loves Park on September 22. For more information, email customercare@girlscoutsni.org, call 844-GSNI-4-ME, or visit www.girlscoutsni.org.

 

Wondering Why Girl Scouts?

At Girl Scouts, girls are our first and only priority. And they always will be. See how girls prepare for leadership, adventure, and success at why.girlscouts.org. This dynamic digital experience showcases Girl Scouts as a powerhouse where girls develop key skills for a lifetime. Learn more at why.girlscouts.org today!

 

Girl Scouts don't just dream big; we take action. Are you ready to change the world with us? www.girlscouts.org/all

 

We’re Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois

We believe every girl can change the world. With us, Girl Scouts develop the independence and confidence to guide their own lives and build a better world. We put girls in the driver’s seat and encourage them to customize their own experience. With programs focused on the outdoors, career and interest exploration, travel and global community, and practical life skills, in addition to community service projects, every girl can unlock her full potential and be amazing!

 

We serve 16 counties including parts or all of Boone, Carroll, Cook, DeKalb, DuPage, Jo Daviess, Kane, Kendall, Lake, LaSalle, Lee, McHenry, Ogle, Stephenson, Whiteside, and Winnebago. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsni.org or call 844-GSNI-4-ME (844-476-4463).

 

Donation Leads To Nursing Program Upgrades

A gift from Southern California philanthropist Ralph Scriba has led to significant instructional enhancements within the Illinois Valley Community College nursing program.

 

Scriba’s $50,000 September donation led to the recent purchase of two patient simulators including “Nursing Anne” to replace the former “Meti man” manikin the department used for more than a decade.

 

“The differences between the manikin and the new simulator are tremendous,” said nursing lab instructor Laura Hodgson. They include:  

  • Wireless technology makes Nursing Anne much more life-like. The previous manikin had a large electrical cord.

  • Nursing Anne’s compressor is built-into her left thigh. The previous manikin was tethered to a very large compressor with a 25-foot hose. “I hid the compressor in the closet due to the noise and the size,” Hodgson said.

  • Nursing Anne has life-like moveable joints.

Along with the simulators from Laerdal Medical Corporation of Wappinger’s Falls, N.Y., the donation enabled upgrades on two older manikins to ‘Nursing Anne’ capabilities.  

“This increases the availability and frequency of simulation to more students,” said Director of Nursing Division Julie Hogue.

 

Hodgson noted the contribution also funded the purchase of several hospital-based scenarios to simulate real-life situations in a lab setting.

 

“Our students will gain critically important knowledge and training for years to come thanks to Mr. Scriba’s generosity,” she said.

 

Hogue said there are currently 133 students in the program with 163 expected to be enrolled next year – and all will use the simulators.

 

In January, Scriba donated an additional $50,000 to help the college launch a Medical Assistant program that will begin in January 2020. Over the past six years, Scriba, a 1951 LaSalle-Peru-Oglesby Junior College graduate, has donated $350,000.

 

“This gift is a perfect, quantifiable example of how Ralph enhances instruction for hundreds, if not thousands of students,” said IVCC President Jerry Corcoran.

 

Barry Cloyd Program May 2 at the Princeton Public Library

Singer/Songwriter Barry Cloyd will present a program on “Burl Ives, Midwestern Minstrel” at the Princeton Public Library Thursday, May 2 at 6:30 p.m. This original program will include stories and songs that give a taste of the history and music of this most amazing American folk music legend, Burl Icle Ivanhoe Ives.  Ives became known worldwide not only as the pre-eminent folk musician of the 40’s, 50’s & 60’s, but as an Academy Award winning actor, voice-over artist and all around star of stage, screen and vinyl. 

 

Barry Cloyd is an award-winning musician in his own right and brings the passion, drama and humor of Ives’ “up & down” career to audiences through tales of his life and times and plenty of those well-known and well-loved songs such as “Blue Tailed Fly,” “Wayfairing Stranger,” and many others.  Mr. Ives became, in the words of Carl Sandburg himself, “the mightiest ballad singer of this or any other century.”

Local Girl Scouts' Pottowatomie Service Unit to Host Ceremony for Highest Awards

Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois’ Pottowatomie Service Unit, which represents Girl Scouts in St. Charles and West Chicago, will host a ceremony presenting Girl Scout highest awards on Thursday, April 25, 6:45 p.m., at Norton Creek Elementary, 2033 Smith Road, in West Chicago. The ceremony will include recognition for Cassidy Beran and Taylor Keene, both of West Chicago, who earned Girl Scouting’s highest award—the Girl Scout Gold Award.

 

Beran’s Girl Scout Gold Award project helped younger generations face one of the things people fear the most—public speaking. By addressing this fear at an early age, she helped children develop public speaking skills and self-confidence. She formed and led a team which assisted her in implementing Gold & Blue public speaking workshops for third, fourth, and fifth grade students at Norton Creek Elementary. Beran wrote lesson plans for each workshop and shared them with the school district, so the project would be sustainable over the years.

 

Keene earned her Girl Scout Gold Award with a project designed to create awareness around the function of service dogs and their place in society. She partnered with VIP Service Dog Foundation, and a dog named Elf. Working with an advisor from the foundation, a dog trainer, the future owner of Elf, and others, Keene underwent eight months of service dog training. She trained with Elf everywhere, including grocery stores, shopping malls, school events, the library, and doctor's appointments. At each location, Keene educated others on service dogs. The family receiving Elf will benefit from changes in their son’s routine, safety, and happiness.

 

The ceremony will include recognition for local Girl Scouts who may have earned the Girl Scout Bronze Award, the highest award a Girl Scout Junior (grades 4–5) can earn, and the Girl Scout Silver Award, the highest award a Girl Scout Cadette (grade 6–8) can earn. Girls demonstrating leadership achievement through becoming a Program Aide or earning awards for Counselor-in-Training I, Counselor-in-Training II, or Volunteer-in-Training may also be recognized.

 

The event will feature a bridging ceremony where Girl Scouts walk across a bridge to signify their advancement to the next Girl Scout level along with a rededication ceremony where all Girl Scouts present will rededicate themselves to building and becoming girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place.

 

The Girl Scout Gold Award

 

The Girl Scout Gold Award is the highest award a Girl Scout can earn. It represents the highest achievement in Girl Scouting, recognizing girls who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through remarkable Take Action projects which have sustainable impact in their local and global communities. The award encourages girls to explore many facets of leadership today's society needs, including leadership of self, leadership through influence of peers, and leadership as a mentor/coach. Gold Award projects help girls develop project management skills, solve a community need, and are designed to be sustainable.

 

Girls can earn highest awards at various Girl Scout levels. Girl Scout Juniors (grades 4–5) can earn the Girl Scout Bronze Award while Girl Scout Cadettes (grades 6–8) can earn the Girl Scout Silver Award. Girl Scout Seniors and Ambassadors (grades 9–12) can earn the Girl Scout Gold Award.

 

The following seven steps are required to earn the Gold Award:  

  • Choose an issue: Use values and skills to identify a community issue you care about.

  • Investigate: Research everything about the issue.

  • Get Help: Invite others to support and take action with you.

  • Create a Plan: Create a project plan that achieves sustainable and measurable impact.

  • Present Your Plan/Get Feedback: Present your project plan to your Girl Scout council.

  • Take Action: Take the lead to carry out your plan.

  • Educate and Inspire: Share what you have experienced with others.

 

What makes the Girl Scout Gold Award unique? The Gold Award develops and tests multiple types of leadership. It asks girls to discover, connect, and take action to develop a sustainable solution to a community problem. The award requires 80 hours minimum of personal time investment in a project. It challenges girls to identify and work in a topic area for which they have a strong interest and passion.

 

Starting in 1916, the best and brightest have undertaken projects to improve their communities—and the world. The Golden Eaglet insignia, the highest award in Girl Scouts from 1916 to 1939, marked the beginning of a long tradition of recognizing the extraordinary efforts of extraordinary girls. From 1940 to 1963, the Curved Bar Award was the highest honor in Girl Scouts. From 1963 to 1980, the highest award was called First Class. Since 1980, the Gold Award has inspired girls to find the greatness inside themselves and share their ideas and passions with their communities!

 

GSNI 10th Anniversary: Rooted in History. Rising into the Future.

 

Backed by over 100 years of proven Girl Scout experience, four Girl Scout councils joined hands in 2009 and promised to propel girl leadership into the future together! In 2019, Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois will mark ten vibrant years of putting girls first at the center of all we do—from all-girl fun and adventure to unprecedented leadership opportunities found nowhere else. We have kept our promise to girls, and we always will!

 

Join us as we celebrate with lively family and girl events in local communities where it all began! Be part of our 10th Anniversary events and earn our special 10th Anniversary fun patch—Water, Land, Air! Girl Scouts Go Everywhere!

 

GSNI’s 10th Anniversary events include Over the Edge 4 Girl Scouts and Air Fair at Pheasant Run Resort in St. Charles, on June 1, 2019; the 15th Annual Thin Mint Sprint at Harlem High School in Machesney Park, on September 21, 2019, and the 2nd Annual All-Girl and Family Fishing Derby and Water Whimsy at Rock Cut State Park in Loves Park on September 22. For more information, email customercare@girlscoutsni.org, call 844-GSNI-4-ME, or visit www.girlscoutsni.org.

 

Wondering Why Girl Scouts?

 

At Girl Scouts, girls are our first and only priority. And they always will be. See how girls prepare for leadership, adventure, and success at why.girlscouts.org. This dynamic digital experience showcases Girl Scouts as a powerhouse where girls develop key skills for a lifetime. Learn more at why.girlscouts.org today!

 

Girl Scouts don't just dream big; we take action. Are you ready to change the world with us? www.girlscouts.org/all

 

We’re Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois

 

We believe every girl can change the world. With us, Girl Scouts develop the independence and confidence to guide their own lives and build a better world. We put girls in the driver’s seat and encourage them to customize their own experience. With programs focused on the outdoors, career and interest exploration, travel and global community, and practical life skills, in addition to community service projects, every girl can unlock her full potential and be amazing!

 

We serve 16 counties including parts or all of Boone, Carroll, Cook, DeKalb, DuPage, Jo Daviess, Kane, Kendall, Lake, LaSalle, Lee, McHenry, Ogle, Stephenson, Whiteside, and Winnebago. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsni.org or call 844-GSNI-4-ME (844-476-4463).

Landmark Camp Dean Shows Off New Amenities for Potential Summer Campers at Community Open House

Camp Dean, home to generations of Girl Scout campers and many local outdoor enthusiasts, is hosting an open house on Sunday, April 28, from 12:30–3:30 p.m., at 46W253 Camp Dean Road in Big Rock. The event will showcase improvements to the camp, including additions to the camp’s famous goat population, new crate-stacking activity area, archery and tomahawk throwing stations, a mud kitchen, and locations of new four-season cabins!

 

This free event is open to the public and will feature tours of new amenities at Camp Dean, fun hands-on camp activities (including roasting s’mores!), along with a GSNI Rope Runners regional competition, presented by Danfoss. All interested Girl Scouts, potential Girl Scouts, and their families can learn which summer camp session is a good fit for their camper. Camp staff will be on hand to answer questions and accept camp registrations during the event.

 

For more information, email customercare@girlscoutsni.org, call 844-GSNI-4-ME, or visit www.girlscoutsni.org.

 

Why Camp?

Camping is a great way for girls to explore leadership, build skills, and develop a deep appreciation for nature. Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois has a variety of facilities—from tents and cabins to year-round lodges—that are available for Girl Scouts to create their own unique camping experience or join us for council-sponsored camping events where we provide the activities and supplies. With new activities and amenities at all our camps, there is something for every girl!

 

GSNI 10th Anniversary: Rooted in History. Rising into the Future.

Backed by over 100 years of proven Girl Scout experience, four Girl Scout councils joined hands in 2009 and promised to propel girl leadership into the future together! In 2019, Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois will mark ten vibrant years of putting girls first at the center of all we do—from all-girl fun and adventure to unprecedented leadership opportunities found nowhere else. We have kept our promise to girls, and we always will!

 

Join us as we celebrate with lively family and girl events in local communities where it all began! Be part of our 10th Anniversary events and earn our special 10th Anniversary fun patch—Water, Land, Air! Girl Scouts Go Everywhere!

 

GSNI’s 10th Anniversary events include Over the Edge 4 Girl Scouts and Air Fair at Pheasant Run Resort in St. Charles, on June 1, 2019; the 15th Annual Thin Mint Sprint at Harlem High School in Machesney Park, on September 21, 2019, and the 2nd Annual All-Girl and Family Fishing Derby and Water Whimsy at Rock Cut State Park in Loves Park on September 22. For more information, email customercare@girlscoutsni.org, call 844-GSNI-4-ME, or visit www.girlscoutsni.org.

 

Wondering Why Girl Scouts?

At Girl Scouts, girls are our first and only priority. And they always will be. See how girls prepare for leadership, adventure, and success at why.girlscouts.org. This dynamic digital experience showcases Girl Scouts as a powerhouse where girls develop key skills for a lifetime. Learn more at why.girlscouts.org today!

 

Girl Scouts don't just dream big; we take action. Are you ready to change the world with us? www.girlscouts.org/all

 

We’re Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois

We believe every girl can change the world. With us, Girl Scouts develop the independence and confidence to guide their own lives and build a better world. We put girls in the driver’s seat and encourage them to customize their own experience. With programs focused on the outdoors, career and interest exploration, travel and global community, and practical life skills, in addition to community service projects, every girl can unlock her full potential and be amazing!

 

We serve 16 counties including parts or all of Boone, Carroll, Cook, DeKalb, DuPage, Jo Daviess, Kane, Kendall, Lake, LaSalle, Lee, McHenry, Ogle, Stephenson, Whiteside, and Winnebago. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsni.org or call 844-GSNI-4-ME (844-476-4463).

 

IVCC Hosts "The Struggle is Real" April 25

 Illinois Valley Community College hosts “The Struggle is Real,” a panel discussion about failure from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, April 25 in Rooms CTC124-125.

 

The free event features IVCC Dean of Learning Resources Dr. Patrice Hess, Assistant Director of Admissions, Records and Transfer Services Aseret Loveland and students Nic Bollis and Lillian Rodrigues sharing their own stories of failure and how they bounced back.

 

Disability Services Coordinator and instructor Tina Hardy said, “We hope attendees will come away with the idea that struggle, failure and disappointment are common, just part of being human.  Everyone experiences these things, no matter how put together others look on the outside or on social media.

 

“We’ll also discuss coping strategies and the resilience that’s needed to make it day-to-day in this world. Successful people aren’t perfect. They’ve just figured out ways to cope, adjust, and move forward,” she added. 

 

Students are preparing for final exams, determining what college they will transfer to and applying for jobs in the workforce. Hardy has advice if things do not work out how they initially hoped.

 

“Acknowledge the disappointment. Take ownership of the things that you did and did not do to get to the point where you are. Get moving and make a Plan B. It’s the rare person whose Plan A has worked out start to finish.

 

“Seek help from your family, friends, and all the great resource people at IVCC as you move forward. As the quote on my wall says, ‘Failure is not the opposite of success, it is part of success.’”

Sen. Rezin Bill To Help Prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Passes Senate

Unsafe sleep environments are often a large contributor to infant deaths labeled as Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) said State Senator Sue Rezin (R-Morris), who is chief sponsor of legislation that puts stricter requirements in place following an investigation where a child died suddenly and unexpectedly. Senate Bill 1568 passed the Senate last week on Wednesday, April 10.

 

SB 1568 would require coroners to conduct an autopsy following the investigation as well as list any environmental factors that may have contributed to the child’s death. The bill would also require the Department of Public Health to publish current data that it receives from coroner reports so that the public has access to reporting concerning SIDS.

 

“Too often, infant deaths are being ruled as SIDS even when there are unsafe factors present at the scene where the infant passed,” said Sen. Rezin. “By just putting SIDS on the death certificate, potentially valuable information is being left out that could help prevent infant deaths in the future.”

 

The legislation was brought to Sen. Rezin by a constituent, Ashley Lamps, who lost her son in 2013 to SIDS. Lamps now runs a foundation that advocates for SIDS awareness and the use of safe sleep practices.

 

SB 1568 now heads to the House of Representatives for consideration.

Sen. Weaver On Panel Discussing Proposed Changes to Income Tax System

State Sen. Chuck Weaver (R-Peoria) was one of four lawmakers who talked with Chicago leaders April 15 about the Constitutional Amendment proposed by Gov. J.B. Pritzker to fundamentally change the state’s flat rate income tax to a progressive rate income tax.

 

Sen. Weaver joined State Sen. Elgie Sims (D-Chicago), State Rep. David McSweeney (R-Cary) and State Rep. Will Guzzardi (D-Chicago) in the City Club of Chicago’s panel discussion about “Graduated Income Tax: What does it mean for Illinois?”

 

Weaver says the progressive income tax proposal is more like an introductory cable offer to get people to vote to remove the flat tax limits, and he believes the end result will be higher taxes on middle-income families.

 

“Illinois has highest tax rates in the country. We have a serious spending problem, not a revenue problem. The progressive tax makes it even easier for Illinois to tax middle-income families,” Weaver said. “Illinois needs the discipline that the flat tax in the current Constitution offers.”

 

The 37th District Senator also warned that state government’s continued reliance on tax-and-spend policies, as well as its past track record in overspending, will continue to drive individuals and businesses from Illinois.

 

“I believe changing the Constitution and making it easier to raise taxes will only encourage more people and jobs to leave our state. It is happening downstate already,” said Weaver.

 

On April 10, the majority party in the Senate advanced out of committee a proposed progressive income tax that provides no protections for middle-income families and would give those lawmakers the ability to raise taxes in the future.

 

Senate Joint Resolution Constitutional Amendment #1 (SJRCA #1) will place a referendum on the 2020 General Election ballot asking voters if they support moving Illinois from a flat tax to a progressive tax structure. And while the measure advancing in the Senate deals with putting the question on the ballot, there is no legislation that would limit future tax increases.

 

The City Club of Chicago is a non-profit, non-partisan organization whose members include prominent business, civic and government leaders in Chicago. Founded in 1903, it is the longest-running civic forum in Chicago.

IVCC Wind Ensemble in Concert May 5

Illinois Valley Community College’s Wind Ensemble will be in concert at 3 p.m. Sunday, May 5 in the Dr. Mary Margaret Weeg Cultural Centre.

 

    The performance includes “Manhattan Beach March” and “The Fairest of the Fair” by John Philip Sousa/Frederick Fennel, “Poet and Peasant Overture” by Franz von Suppe/Kenneth Singleton, “Eternal Father, Strong to Save” by Claude T. Smith, “Incantation and Dance” by John Barnes Chance, “Danse Celestiale” by Robert Sheldon and “Folk Festival” from the motion picture “The Gadfly” by Dmitri Shostakovich/Donald Hunsberger.

Conducted by Gene Montgomery, the ensemble includes IVCC students, local and regional music educators and community members dedicated to the promotion of quality wind and percussion music.

 

The concert is also a farewell to conductor and part-time music instructor Montgomery, who retires May 18 after over 30 years with IVCC.

 

In his retirement letter, he recalled, “It was approximately 29 or 30 years ago that I was sitting in the office of Dr. Sam Rogal, Dean of what was then the Humanities/Fine Arts Division. We were lamenting the fact there had been a several year hiatus of having an instrumental performing group at IVCC, and he asked me if I knew of anyone capable of re-instating the ensemble.

 

“Although I was still a full-time public school instrumental and choral teacher, I quickly answered that I would be more than happy to accept the challenge,” Montgomery wrote. “Since that time, the IVCC Wind Ensemble has been widely respected among music educators in Illinois.”

 

Dean of Humanities, Fine Arts and Social Sciences Robyn Schiffman said, “Gene has grown the Wind Ensemble over the years to represent the best of community and student musicians. He has brought a level of class and sophistication to the musical choices and performances. His dedication will be missed and very hard to replace.”

 

The concert is free and the public is invited to attend.

IVCH Occupational Health Nurses now NIOSH-certified

The four nurses who staff the occupational health department at Illinois Valley Community Hospital have all completed training to become certified spirometry technicians and can now administer pulmonary function tests to workers whose jobs may expose them to airborne crystalline silica, which can be a factor in the development of lung disease and other serious illnesses.

 

 A regulation from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires workers who risk exposure to respirable crystalline silica to be to be tested periodically to determine how well their lungs are working.  OSHA says the testing must be done by spirometry technicians who have current certificates from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

 

IVCH occupational health nurses Deb Tostovarsnik, APN, FNP-C, COHN; Sue Walters, BSN; Stephanie Spanos, RN; and Barb Bianchi, RN; are all NIOSH-certified, according to Dr. Joel Leifheit, medical director of the department.  Tostovarsnik, a certified occupational health nurse, and Dr. Leifheit are also both on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration registry of certified medical examiners, meaning they can administer physical examinations to truck and bus drivers.

 

Dr. Leifheit said the four IVCH nurses are also certified by the Council for Accreditation on Occupational Hearing Conservation (CAOHC) to perform hearing tests on workers whose jobs place them in noisy environments.  They can also administer Department of Transportation-mandated drug and alcohol tests. For more information, call 815-780-3202.

 

Enbridge donates another $5,000 for welding scholarships

Enbridge recently made its fourth $5,000 donation to the Illinois Valley Community College Foundation for welding scholarships for students who live along the pipeline and have an interest in working in the oil and gas pipeline industry.

 

Full- or part-time second-year welding students who live in Marseilles, Naplate, Ottawa, Grand Ridge, Streator or Serena are eligible for the $1,000 Enbridge Pipeline Industry Awareness Scholarships.

 

    “Enbridge has given significant help to our students pursuing welding careers in the high-demand, high-pay pipeline industry,” said IVCC President Jerry Corcoran who noted the corporation has now donated $20,000 to IVCC since 2014.

 

Enbridge Inc. is North America’s premier energy infrastructure company with strategic business platforms that include an extensive network of crude oil, liquids and natural gas pipelines, regulated natural gas distribution utilities and renewable power generation.

 

For information on IVCC’s welding program, call Dean of Workforce Development Shane Lange at (815) 224-0219.

 

IVCC hosts a viewing of "Audrie & Daisy" April 30

Illinois Valley Community College’s Student Services and Human Services Organization along with Safe Journeys host a viewing of the film “Audrie & Daisy” at noon Tuesday, April 30 in Room C316.

 

The film follows the journey of two sexual assault survivors, the community response and the devastating impact of social media.

 

Snacks and beverages are provided and a discussion with staff from Safe Journeys will follow the film. The public is invited to attend.

 

IVCC hosts "Spring Reflect and Renew" April 29

Illinois Valley Community College’s Student Services and Human Services Organization along with Safe Journeys host “Spring Reflect and Renew” from 1 to 3 p.m. Monday, April 29 in Room C325-326.

 

This free event is a collaborative discussion with staff, students, faculty and community members about how to support sexual violence survivors and create a culture free from sexual violence.

 

Strategies for stress relief, mindfulness techniques and self-care giveaways are also part of the event. The public is invited to attend.

 

Perry Memorial Hospital Leaders Showcased at the State Capitol a Quality Improvement Initiative That Advances Care and Reduces Costs

A Perry Memorial Hospital initiative to improving diabetes care and outcomes through
education was on display in the State Capitol on April 3 as part of the Illinois Health and Hospital Association’s (IHA) Quality Advocacy Showcase. Perry Memorial Hospital leaders Debora May-Rickard, Chief Nursing Officer and Celia Goers, Director of Care Management met with legislators to share how the initiative has benefited patients, families and communities while reducing healthcare costs.

 

Perry Memorial Hospital leaders were among over 100 hospital and health system leaders from across Illinois who met with legislators about their efforts to improve patient care and safety. In sum, 90 hospitals and health systems showcased their improvement projects at the event.

 

“I found this event to be very enlightening and productive,” said Debora May-Rickard, Chief Nursing Officer. “I was able to connect with our legislators to provide my stance on pending healthcare legislation. Secondly, the ability to connect with 98 other Illinois facilities and discuss quality strategy and share options on common needs and quality of patient care was excellent.”

 

Rickard met with Rep. Dan Swanson during the event. Rickard said, “I found Rep. Swanson to be very engaged and informed of our current health care needs and discussions. He shared interesting information to support the future growth of our community and healthcare.”
With a focus on Diabetes, Perry Memorial Hospital’s project trained a diabetes self-education
management coordinator, implemented “Living Well and Feeling Well” education classes and offers nutritional therapy with Perry licenses dieticians. The hospital invested $6.2 in training and marketing realizing a cost savings of $160,000 in reduced admissions. For the patients, families and communities, Perry Memorial Hospital serves, the project:


• Improves diabetes self-management
• Promotes preventive health and lifestyle changes
• Increases access to local resources

 

IHA’s Quality Advocacy Showcase, in its fourth year, visually demonstrates the work of physicians, nurses, quality improvement leaders and hospital administrators to develop and implement solutions to improve care. IHA produced one 30-by-42-inch poster per hospital or health system project for the event.


“The Showcase gives hospital leaders and frontline staff an important opportunity to share their efforts to advance quality care,” said IHA President and CEO A.J. Wilhelmi. “It’s essential that policymakers and elected officials see how Illinois hospitals are doing more to serve their patients and communities— through innovation and practical strategies that improve outcomes.”

SciFest at IVCC April 19

SciFest is back at Illinois Valley Community College from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, April 19 in the gym.

 

The annual event hosted by IVCC’s CHEM/STEM Club is free and features science experiments including fluidized sand bed, a giant Newton’s Cradle, Ruben’s Tube and a screen printer.

 

Hands-on experiments and demonstrations in chemistry, biology, geology and physics include Dr. Matthew Johll testing his strength against the imploding barrel.  

 

The event draws hundreds of young students and parents each year. For information, contact Johll at matthew.johll@gmail.com or call (815) 224-0468.

 

IVCC Choir Concert and Voice Student Recital May 6

The Illinois Valley Community College choir will be in concert with voice student recitals at 7 p.m. Monday, May 6 in the Dr. Mary Margaret Weeg Cultural Centre.

 

The choir will be singing “Wade in the Water,” “Because All Men Are Brothers,” “El Ritmo de la Noche,” “It Had to be You” and more.

 

Choir and voice students perform under the direction of instructor Jenilyn Roether. The performance is free and the public is welcome.

 

Varicose Vein Screening

Dr. Mark Williams will be hosting a free varicose vein screening at Perry Memorial Hospital in Princeton on Friday, April 26 and Wednesday, May 1.   Dr. Mark Williams said, “Varicose veins are not always a cosmetic issue. The valves in your leg veins may need repair due to venous disease.”

 

To raise awareness of the disease and evaluate treatments, Dr. Williams will hold two screenings for a minimally invasive procedure called VNUS ClosureFast.  Venous disease is common among people who have a family history of varicose veins, work in a profession that involves standing for longs hours, have had multiple pregnancies, or are obese.  If you have leg symptoms including fatigue, swelling, discoloration, and even skin ulcerations, then this screening is for you. If conditions are left untreated, symptoms may worsen with time.

 

A benefit of this procedure is a short work to recovery time, resuming normal activity within a day or two.  There is an easy solution, VNUS ClosureFast. The FREE vein screenings will be held April 26, from 3:30 to 5:30 and May 1, from 9:30 to 11:30 in Perry’s General Surgery Clinic located in the Medical Office Building, Suite 205.  Call 815-872-9491 to schedule a screening appointment or register online at perrymemorial.org/vnus.

 

April Board Report IVCC

Illinois Valley Community College will pilot a Transfer Academy this fall allowing dual credit high school students to be released in the afternoon for classes at Ottawa Center, board members learned Thursday.

 

 The initiative will allow high school students to complete all general education core courses over four semesters – with the possibility a few summer courses may also be needed.

 

    “The schedule at Ottawa Center will be well-suited to students pursuing studies in humanities, social sciences and those uncertain what their major will be,” said Vice President for Academic Affairs Deborah Anderson.

 

As with all IVCC dual credit courses, students will receive a 25 percent tuition discount and those qualifying for the federal Free and Reduced Lunch program will pay just the $5 registration fee.  

 

“I anticipate this will bring a new demographic to the Ottawa Center in the afternoons as students are released to take classes there,” said Anderson. “I am also optimistic the experience of the college campus will attract more students to IVCC after high school graduation.”

 

IVCC is also developing a plan to allow dual credit students seeking STEM-related careers to attend afternoon classes on main campus.

 

The board also learned IVCC’s 60-credit Associate of Applied Science degree in Cybersecurity has been approved by the Illinois Community College Board.

 

Beginning this fall, the program will address a surge in demand for skilled workers in information security and will cross-train IT staff to protect networks from cyber threats. Courses include Managing Information Security, Digital Forensics, Security+, Cybersecurity Scripting, Computer Ethics and Ethical Hacking.

 

A 2017 study by the Center for Cyber Safety and Education estimated there will be a 1.8 million worker gap in the information security workforce worldwide by 2022. Security analysts earn a median hourly wage of $45.26 with an annual salary of $94,134, according to the Illinois Department of Employment Security (2018).

 

In other business, the board learned part-time music instructor and Wind Ensemble conductor Gene Montgomery will retire May 18.

 

In his retirement letter, Montgomery recalled, “It was approximately 29 or 30 years ago that I was sitting in the office of Dr. Sam Rogal, Dean of what was then the Humanities/Fine Arts Division. We were lamenting the fact there had been a several year hiatus of having an instrumental performing group at IVCC, and he asked me if I knew of anyone capable of re-instating the ensemble.

 

“Although I was still a full-time public school instrumental and choral teacher, I quickly answered that I would be more than happy to accept the challenge,” Montgomery wrote. “Since that time, the IVCC Wind Ensemble has been widely respected among music educators in Illinois.”

 

    In other action, the board approved:

  • Sabbatical leave for the fall semester for Lauri Carey, a 19-year biology and horticulture instructor. During the sabbatical, Carey will work to improve curriculum and instructional methods in biology.

  • The retirement of 13-year welding instructor Paul Leadingham effective June 30.

  • The $1,469,000 bid of Dodson Plumbing, Heating & AC of Pontiac for the Building C Air Handler Unit/Chiller replacement.

  • Purchase of 71 PCs from Dell Inc. for $47,831 for rooms E215, CTC119 and B213.

  • Three-year licensing from CDW of Malwarebytes Anti-Malware/Anti-Virus software for $24,000. The cloud-based software manages and protects college devices, even off-campus.

The board also learned:

  • La Moille High School will begin a Career Start program in fall 2019 allowing its students to enroll in IVCC Career and Technical Education courses as part of their high school coursework.

  • IVCC nominated The Results Companies of Streator for the Illinois Community College Trustees Association 2019 Business/Industry Partnership Award. The customer service and sales call center has worked with IVCC since 2016 to provide its employees continuing education and college credit toward a customer experience and sales certificate. To date, 108 employees have completed the program and another 41 are now enrolled.

  • Final cost of the Dr. Mary Margaret Weeg Cultural Centre accessibility upgrade was $638,530, about $230,000 under budget. New seating and ADA-compliant ramps to each side of the stage were among the enhancements. The project was partially paid for from a bequest of more than $620,000 from the estate of Walter Durley and Hazel Marie Boyle.

  • Final cost of the exterior stairs upgrade was $138,652, about $95,000 under budget.

  • A new three-year lease has been approved with the Economic Development Corporation of North Central Illinois for $4,284 per year. EDCNCI will move into E building rooms 309, 311 and 312.

  • The retirements of Financial Aid Reconciliation and Compliance Specialist Lorri Foockle effective April 19, longtime facilities groundskeeper Mike Minnick on April 30 and textbook buyer Jackie Carlson on June 28.

  • Recent Student Government Association elections resulted in Matthew Klein of Peru winning as student trustee, Kaitlyn Ruppert of La Salle as SGA president, Lillian Moskalewicz of La Salle as vice president, Cierra Espinoza of Oglesby as treasurer, Andrea Medina of La Salle as SGA secretary, Haley Fittanto of West Brooklyn as sophomore representative, and Megan Brooker of Granville and Karlee Arjes of Peru as sophomore programming board members.

  • Admissions’ March 26 Explore IVCC event “was well planned and executed thanks to the fine work of Quintin Overocker, Aseret Loveland and Gracelyn Quesse,” said IVCC President Jerry Corcoran. “A long list of faculty and staff played a role in making the event worthwhile for prospective students.”

  • The Foundation’s April 3 Giving Day III raised over $29,000.

  • Project Success, a federally-funded TRiO program serving students who are first-generation, low-income or with disabilities, scored a perfect 15 on the Department of Education’s annual performance report for how well a program meets its objectives. “Project Success exceeded all rates in persistence, good academic standing, associate degree or certificate attainment, and transfers to a 4-year institution. We had funding to serve 165 students and ended up serving 179,” said Corcoran.

  • The IVCC board and chair Jane Goetz hosted the Illinois Community College Trustees Association Northwest Region April 3. Computer aided design instructor Dorene Data presented on the college’s MIMIC (Making Industry Meaningful in College) program and on an initiative to increase the number of women in technology fields.

  • The nursing honor society Alpha Delta Nu inducted 16 members Monday.

  • IVCC sophomores Lillian Rodrigues of Mendota and Nic Bollis of Peru were recognized for extraordinary academic achievements at Tuesday’s All-Illinois Phi Theta Kappa banquet in Springfield. As Illinois’ New Century Transfer Scholar, Rodrigues earned a $2,250 scholarship. Both she and Bollis will attend Northern Illinois University next fall. Rodrigues plans a career as a physician’s assistant, Bollis as a pediatric cardiologist.

Weaver to host Town Hall in Princeton April 18

State Sen. Chuck Weaver (R-Peoria) is hosting a Town Hall April 18 at the High School in Princeton.

The Town Hall is scheduled to start at 6:00 p.m. in the Auditorium at the High School at 103 S. Euclid Avenue.

 

“Our Town Hall allows Princeton area residents to come together and learn more about what is happening in state and local governments, and share their thoughts on legislative and community matters,” Weaver said. “It is also an opportunity for the Weaver Team to get to know you better as a community and as individuals, listen to your ideas, and help with your concerns if we can.”

 

For more information, call 309-693-4921.

 

 

School Spirit at IVCC

Donald Mills of La Salle sports a vintage La Salle-Peru High School letterman jacket at
Illinois Valley Community College today. The semi-retired Mills, currently taking an Excel
course through IVCC’s Continuing Education Center, said he takes a class whenever possible.
Not an LP alum, Mills said the jacket is a gift from a friend and a favorite of his.

SENATE WEEK IN REVIEW: April 8-12, 2019

A controversial graduated income tax plan was advanced during the week, with Democrat lawmakers and state officials claiming it is time to “let the people vote,” even though they will not allow similar votes on other issues such as term limits, pension reform and fair maps.  

In other action, the Senate spent long hours on the floor passing bills to the House that range from measures to help secure classrooms in the event of an armed intruder, address the teacher shortage, and work to prevent deadly ethylene oxide leaks.

 

Graduated income tax offers no protections for middle-income families

 

On April 10, Democrat members on the Senate Executive Committee advanced a proposed graduated income tax that provides no protections for middle-income families and would give those lawmakers the ability to raise taxes in the future.

Senate Joint Constitutional Amendment (SJRCA) 1 would place a referendum on the 2020 General Election ballot asking voters if they support moving Illinois from a flat tax to a graduated tax structure.

 

Senate Republican Leader Bill Brady, who like his Senate Republican colleagues opposes a graduated income tax, noted that the crafters of Illinois’ current constitution chose a flat tax, which the people of Illinois embraced, because the flat tax provides middle-income families better protections from politicians.

 

And while the measure advancing in the Senate deals with putting the question on the ballot, there is no measure showing what future tax rates would be if it’s adopted.

In March, Gov. J.B. Pritzker announced his proposed rates; however, Pritzker’s rates are yet to be introduced in legislative form.  When testifying before the Senate Executive Committee, Deputy Gov. Dan Hynes was unable to give middle-income taxpayers any assurance that these rates would remain level in coming years.

 

In hopes of providing some protections for Illinois families, Senate Republican lawmakers have offered SJRCA 12 to require a two-thirds super-majority vote in both chambers of the General Assembly to increase any tax or fee.  Currently, legislators only need a simple majority to pass a tax increase or to implement a new tax.

 

Senate Republicans are also calling on the Administration to let the people have their voices heard on other important issues, such as term limits, pension reform and fair maps.  

 

Improving school safety

 

The Senate passed legislation during the week aimed at letting Illinois schools utilize an affordable and easy-to-use option for locking classrooms to protect students in case of an intruder or other threat to students’ safety.

Senate Bill 1371 allows school districts to use door locking mechanisms that attach to the door and are lockable and unlockable from the inside of the classroom without a key.  The mechanisms must be unlockable from the outside by a key or tool, and police and fire departments would be informed of the locations of the locks.

The legislation offers a way for teachers and students to lock their classroom securely from the inside in the event of an emergency.

 

Addressing teacher shortage

 

Legislation aimed at helping to relieve the current teacher shortage also passed out of the Senate during the week.

Senate Bill 1809 aims to help students enter the teaching field, by expanding the eligibility of MAP grant recipients to include students who have already received bachelor degrees or have 135 credit hours, but are seeking to earn their teaching certificate through an educator preparation program.

The bill also requires that the recipients must teach in Illinois for three out of the next five years, and states that they can only be eligible to receive the grant for one academic year.

 

Targeting Sterigenics crisis

 

Members of the Senate unanimously passed legislation during the week that would protect Illinois residents, like those Willowbrook residents impacted by Sterigenics, from the hidden dangers of ethylene oxide.

Senate Bill 1854 prohibits any facilities from having any fugitive emissions of ethylene oxide six months after it takes effect.  The IEPA will be required to study ethylene oxide levels throughout the state to set a baseline for the levels.

In addition, it would subject facilities to stack testing, which tests emissions at all release points at least once per year.  The facilities would also be subject to ambient air testing, at random, four times per year. Any facility that emits ethylene oxide at a level higher than standards set in the federal Clean Air Act or by the IEPA would be required to immediately cease operations until sufficient changes are made to reduce the emissions below both federal and state standards.

 

Senate Bill 1852 also cleared the Senate during the week.  The legislation states that the case of an ethylene oxide leak, facilities are required to notify local government officials and affected property owners within 2,500 feet of the leak.

 

Senator Rezin's Youth Advisory Council Brings Local High Schoolers to Springfield

 Dozens of high school students from across State Senator Sue Rezin’s 38th Senate District traveled to Springfield on April 11 to participate in her Youth Advisory Council (YAC).

 

Sen. Rezin’s bi-annual YAC gives students a unique, up-close and hands-on perspective of what it would be like to work in various roles in state government.

 

“I first met these students during the first installment of my Youth Advisory Council back in the fall, and I continue to be amazed by their level of engagement and interest,” said Sen. Rezin. “This event gives students a chance to really dig into public policy. It’s important that we, as legislators, engage with our young people through the legislative process because they are the leaders of our future.”

 

Sen. Rezin hosted the all-day Youth Advisory Council at the Capitol, where she talked with high school students from St. Bede Academy, Coal City, Morris, Wilmington, LaSalle-Peru, Ottawa, and Putnam County High Schools about Illinois government and how the Legislature operates.

 

The students also toured the Capitol, watched Senate Floor action from the gallery, and were able to hear from a wide variety of speakers, including Chicago mayor-elect Lori Lightfoot.

 

The students later participated in a mock committee hearing, where they were broken up into groups representing the key players in the realm of public policy including senators, lobbyists, and concerned citizens.

 

“I host this event every year, and every year I’m just as impressed as the last about how informed these kids are in the legislative process,” said Sen. Rezin. “It’s refreshing to see the passion they have on issues that matter to them.”

Protecting our Species April 24 at the Princeton Public Library

Voices from the Prairie in cooperation with the Princeton Public Library will present a program titled “Protecting our Species” on Wednesday, April 24 at 6:30 p.m.

 

Representatives from The Illinois Audubon Society-Birdsong Chapter, the National Land Institute, and Wetlands Initiative will be there to discuss the important topics of:

 

·         What can you do, why should you do it, and how can you do it?

 

·         Why is it important to protect our species?

 

·         How does what you do ultimately impact “us” whether it’s environmentally, financially, or individually through quality of life and well-being.

 

This program is FREE & All Are Welcome

University of Illinois Extension Offers Program On Invasive Insects

The Four Seasons Gardening Program from the University of Illinois Extension continues with a session titled “Invasive Insects.”

 

University of Illinois Extension Pest Survey Coordinator Kelly Estes will talk about Illinois’ “Most Unwanted,” the latest pests in Illinois that threaten farmers, gardeners and homeowners. Kelly will discuss identification characteristics, host preferences, where these insects are right now, and what their population means to Illinois. With the knowledge of pest damage that has already occurred from the Emerald Ash Borer and the Gypsy Moth, identification of these future invading insects and locating hot spots is key for prevention.

 

This program will be offered via a live webinar on Tuesday, April 23rd at 1:30 p.m. at the following University of Illinois Extension Offices: Bureau County in Princeton; Marshall-Putnam Counties in Henry; and LaSalle County in Ottawa. This webinar may also be viewed from wherever you have internet access by pre-registering at go.illinois.edu/4seasons_webinars. Recorded videos of these sessions can be viewed following the program at go.illinois.edu/fourseasonsrecordings.  

 

This is the second in the spring series. The next program, titled “Which Grass is Which? Identifying Grasses Made Easy,” is set for Tuesday, June 11th at 1:30 p.m. at the local University of Illinois Extension Offices previously listed.

 

Each session is free to the public. Advance registration is needed. Phone or email the LaSalle County University of Illinois Extension office for more details at 815-433-0707, or you may email Extension Program Coordinator Meg Overocker at meo@illinois.edu.  

 

University of Illinois Extension provides educational programs and research-based information to help Illinois residents improve their quality of life, develop skills and solve problems. If you need a reasonable accommodation to participate in this program, please call the LaSalle County Extension office at 815-433-0707. Early requests are strongly encouraged to allow sufficient time for meeting your access needs. University of Illinois Extension provides equal opportunities in programs and employment. University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences – United States Department of Agriculture – Local Extension Councils Cooperating

 

Rezin Speaks Out Against Graduated Income Tax

State Senator Sue Rezin (R-Morris) spoke out against the graduated income tax proposal (SJRCA 1) during Wednesday’s Senate Executive Committee hearing, and issued the following statement.

 

“The graduated income tax proposal puts middle income families at risk and fails to offer any sort of protection against future tax increases. The proposed rates that have been floated around may make up the budget deficit for now, but what happens when we continue to increase our spending like we have done year after year. Someone will have to make up that money, and that will more than likely be the middle class. The high income tax rates will gradually creep downward and no longer will it only be the “rich” paying, it’ll be the middle class families.”

IVCC hosts annual Academic Awards Ceremony

 Illinois Valley Community College’s recent Academic Awards Ceremony honored Thomas J. McCormack Scholars, students who have achieved distinction for two- and three-consecutive semesters, and Phi Theta Kappa All-Illinois Academic Team members.

 

McCormack Scholars in 2019 are Nicholas Bollis, Lauren Giordano, Nicolas Martinez and Shay Scheri, all of Peru, Shane Peek of Rutland, Morgan Phillips of Lostant, Bryar Lindenmeyer of Mendota, Summer Hoagland-Abernathy, Mason Kannel and Hannah Miskel of Ottawa.

 

Considered IVCC’s most prestigious academic award, McCormack scholars maintain a minimum 3.75 GPA in at least 14 credits over three consecutive semesters.

 

Giordano, a December 2018 IVCC graduate and honors student, was among the featured speakers. She served in student government, was a peer tutor, contributed to the student literary publication River Currents and co-captained the tennis team. Next fall, she will transfer to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to double major in communications and English.

 

“As I reflect on my time at IVCC, I can’t help but feel grateful that such an exceptional institution is so close to home. I have found myself immersed in a variety of different roles and experiences that have often led me into new and undiscovered territories,” she said.

“With the help of my professors and the many other avenues of support throughout the college, I was able to overcome these obstacles with ease. Through this supportive environment, I gained the confidence to readily accept new challenges while working to accomplish the educational goals I established at the beginning of my college career,” Giordano said.

 

Math Learning Center instructor Mary Black, winner of the 2019 Stephen Charry Memorial Award for Teaching Excellence, also spoke and encouraged students to take with them from IVCC: family, faith, flexibility, fortitude, and failure.

 

“There’s an acronym floating around that the letters in FAIL stand for First Attempt In Learning. Take your failures and look at them the same way — use them as stepping stones and reminders of what you have learned and all that’s ahead for you to learn as you change and grow,” she said.

 

Bollis and Lillian Rodrigues of Mendota were honored for earning Phi Theta Kappa All-Illinois Academic Team awards.

 

Rodrigues received a $2,250 scholarship for being named a 2019 New Century Transfer Pathway Scholar based on her academic accomplishments and leadership. She was the lone Pathway Scholar from Illinois. In all, more than 2,000 students were nominated for the award from 1,200 colleges.

 

Upon graduating from IVCC, she plans to transfer to NIU to major in microbiology. She eventually plans to become a physician’s assistant and return to the area to practice rural medicine.

 

Bollis will also transfer to NIU in the fall and plans a career as a pediatric cardiologist.

Recipients of the Richard Publow Memorial Award for exceptional writing were Alexis Countryman of Compton, first for ENG 0900, Joannah Elaina Cisneros of Oglesby, first for ENG 1001, Haley Elizabeth Gerkitz of Ottawa, second for ENG 1001, Nikolas Muzzarelli, second for ENG 1001 and Noemi Gonzalez, second for ENG 1002 both of La Salle, Amanda Leppert Gomes of Marseilles, first for ENG 1002 and Miriam Hoffman of Earlville, second for ENG 1002.

The award honors the memory of former IVCC English and philosophy instructor Richard Publow.

 

Students maintaining a GPA of 3.25 or higher for three consecutive semesters of full-time enrollment were:

 

Arlington: Jenna Lusietto;

 

Cherry: Matthew Hoscheid, Connor Whitten;

 

Dalzell: Xavier Braboy;

 

Earlville: Hannah Westphal;

 

Granville: William Faletti, Kaitlyn Mellentine;

 

Henry: Victoria Garcia;

 

La Salle: Noemi Gonzalez, Kaleb Salas;

 

Lostant: Morgan Phillips, Michael Stoens, Lidia Templeton;

 

Marseilles: Skylar Hardee, Noah Rowe, Zaria Sheedy, Michael Straith, Kathryn Varland;

 

Mendota: Esmeralda Arteaga, Dillon Bodmer, Elle Bottom, Bryar Lindenmeyer, Lillian Rodrigues;

 

Oglesby: Alison Anthony, Jessica Garber, Alexa Schmitz, Dylan Schweickert;

 

Ottawa: Alexis Bennett, Macie Jo Bolatto, Summer Hoagland-Abernathy, Mason Kannel, Trevor Keegan, Danielle Lindenbaum, Hayle Marshall, Joseph McCague, Hannah Miskell, Andrew Noble, Jenna Pubentz, Bethany Roberts, Cassidy Wilson;

 

Peru: Madison Bejster, Nicholas Bollis, Lauren Giordano, Taylor Hammerich, Nicolas Martinez, Brittany Marx, Nicholas Niner, Andrew Novotney, Elizabeth Peruba, Emily Sampo, Shay Scheri, Ryan Shevlin;

 

Princeton: Madelina Nunez, Kiara Tate, Clayton Zelenik;

 

Rutland: Shane Peek;

 

Sheridan: Jarrid Thorpen;

 

Spring Valley: Vicky King, Joseph Marenda;

 

Streator: Sam Banasiak, Jacqualyn Eilts, Brooke Melvin;

 

Tonica: Matthew Blackowski, Rachel Huska;

 

Utica: Bryanna Hoskins.

 

Two consecutive semester honors went to:

 

Bureau: David Keisler;

 

DePue: Gavin Garcia;

 

Earlville: Stephanie Westphal;

 

Grand Ridge: Andrew Bacon;

 

Granville: Jacob Dudek;

 

Hennepin: Lara Petersen;

 

La Moille: Alana Cherry, Olivia Heinzeroth, Emily Schneider;

 

La Salle: Janice Bardell, Catherine Calderon, Isaac Casas, Sierra Ellinger, Christopher Murphy, Austin Prybylinski, Rebecca Reed, Trevor Samolinski, Braidy Shipp, Mallory Watson Halbleib,

Brandon Wilson;

 

Lostant: Rachel Maggio;

 

Magnolia: Katie Cimei;

 

Marseilles: Mateo Eib, Joshua Johnson, Kylie Marko, Hannah McCormack, Tristen Underwood, Alexis Williamson;

 

Mc Nabb: Megan Thompson;

 

Mendota: Abbie Aldenhoff, Aylin Arellano, Paxton Kennedy, Joseph Lashonse, Leslie Martinez, Christian Salinas, Chandler Schultz;

 

Oglesby: Rachel Black, Marshall Brennan III, Tatum Bruning, Kathleen Shields;

 

Ottawa: Creighton Barnett, Julia Browning, Dustin Covert, Noah Donahue, Brogan Dougherty, Jade Goff, Lainey Goolsby, Presli Lovell, Chloe Maxon, Paul Schrik Jr.;

 

Peru: Marissa Bulak, Madison Cofoid, Abigail Coutre, Molly Ferguson, Alexander Innis, Amber Lynch, Andrew Ostrowski, Jacob Steinberg, Savannah Thomas;

 

Princeton: Kalysta Biskie, Beth Elmore, Phillip Hedges, Jessica Krohn;

 

Sheffield: Abbey Walters;

 

Spring Valley: Brianna Brust, Kaylin Clark, Jacob Corsale;

 

Streator: Andrew Benner, Ryan Coon, Enrique Gallardo, Jose Gonzalez, Matthew Hansen, Michael Hysell, Evan Martin, Kallie Miller, Ryan O’Rourke, Lindsey Salata, Javier Secundino-Hernandez;

 

Utica: Alison Fauth, Cierra Kaldahl;

 

Walnut: Jennifer Linley;

 

Wenona: Hollie Yunker.

 

Emcee Mark Grzybowski, Vice President for Student Services, said the ceremony dates back 52 years to when IVCC was founded in 1967.

 

IVCC President Jerry Corcoran said more than 35,000 degrees and certificates have been awarded to LPO Junior College and IVCC graduates and hundreds of thousands more have enrolled on a part-time basis.

 

“They all have one thing in common: their lives have been enriched because of our college. To the many IVCC ‘ambassadors’ who speak so highly about our college and play an important role in helping students make the wise choice to enroll at our proud institution, we thank you. And to those students here this evening because your hard work has paid off, we honor you.”

IVCC MIMIC Fair April 17

The public is welcome to attend the annual Illinois Valley Community College MIMIC Fair from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, April 17 in the cafeteria foyer.

           

2019 products for sale include a water feature, garden stones, charging tables, modular planter and desk organizer. The students are also hosting a raffle at the fair including a portable greenhouse with a basket filled with garden tools.

           

MIMIC, Making Industry Meaningful in College, is a nationally recognized program placing IVCC students from engineering design, electronics and business in teams to design, manufacture, market and sell a product.

           

Student teams, called “companies,” simulate an industrial company structure, allowing students to experience a workplace environment in a classroom setting.

Officer Safety and Scott's Law

The Illinois Sheriffs’ Association would like to announce the 2019 Officer Safety and Scott’s Law Safety Initiative.

 

Scott's Law Chapter 625 of the Illinois Compiled Statutes (ILCS) 5/11-907(c), mandates that upon approaching a stationary authorized emergency vehicle, when the authorized emergency vehicle is giving a signal by displaying alternately flashing red and blue lights or amber or yellow warning lights, a person who drives an approaching vehicle:

 

• proceed with due caution, yield the right-of-way by making a lane change into a lane not adjacent to that of the authorized emergency vehicle, if possible with due regard to safety and traffic conditions, if on a highway having at least 4 lanes with not less than 2 lanes proceeding in the same direction as the approach vehicle.

 

• proceed with due caution, reduce the speed of the vehicle, maintain a safe speed for road conditions, if changing lanes would be impossible or unsafe.

Sixteen (16) law enforcement officers have been hit while conducting traffic stops on the side of the road in 2019. Illinois has had 4 traffic related officer fatalities already in 2019. Enough is enough.

 

April 12-19, 2019 Sheriffs across the State of Illinois will be participating in a traffic awareness campaign specifically aimed at Scott’s Law and distracted driving violators. The ISA urges all motorists to obey all the rules of the road and stay focused when driving.

 

Move Over, Slow Down and Put Down the Phone.

 

Starved Rock parking fee bill fails, concerns over exempting local residents

State Senator Sue Rezin’s legislation that would allow the Department of Natural Resources to charge a minimal parking fee at Starved Rock failed to pass the full Senate on Wednesday, April 10 with a vote of 29-9. Senate Bill 1310 needed 30 “yes” votes to pass but fell short by one vote.

Following the vote, Sen. Rezin immediately put the bill on postponed consideration, which means she is able to recall the bill giving it another chance at passing.

 

“Unfortunately during floor debate, I heard concerns from my Senate colleagues about my amendment to the bill that would exempt LaSalle County residents from paying a parking fee,” said Sen. Rezin. “I added this provision to the bill because local residents are already on the hook to pay for the increased impact Starved Rock has on our roads and first responders.”

The intent of SB 1310 is to ensure proper safety and maintenance as the park has struggled to keep up with the millions of visitors it sees each year. Sen. Rezin said the fees collected would be very minimal and would only go toward helping the park stay clean, maintain its trails, and provide enhanced public safety.

 

Sen. Rezin also noted that Starved Rock State Park is the most visited state park in Illinois and sees well over two million visitors annually.

 

“We are so fortunate to have such a beautiful park in our region,” said Sen. Rezin. “We must do what we can to maintain this asset and keep it attractive so that visitors continue to want to come here.”

2019 Telemarketing Fraud using ISA

The Illinois Sheriffs’ Association is advising all Illinois county residents that there is currently underway a phone campaign fraudulently using the name and phone numbers of the Illinois Sheriffs' Association. The Illinois Sheriffs' Association never solicits by phone but does conduct a direct mail campaign throughout the state of Illinois endorsed by the individual Sheriffs across Illinois. This mail piece goes out in February each year.

 

Telemarketing fraud costs billions of dollars each year.  Phone solicitors who want you to "act immediately" or are offering a "too good to be true" opportunity are most likely fraudulent.  Remember that if you have any doubts or are highly pressured - Just Hang Up.  

 

You have the right to ask for the following information:

 

    1)     The name, address and phone number of the organization for which they are

        soliciting.

    2)     The name, address and phone number of the telemarketing firm.

    3)     The percentage of every dollar paid to the telemarketing firm.

    4)    Insist on something in writing prior to making a pledge or commitment.

 

If you cannot get the answers to these questions do not hesitate to hang up the phone.  After all, it is your money.

 

Although, there are some legitimate organizations that use telemarketers for their fundraising efforts the Sheriffs of Illinois, through the Illinois Sheriffs' Association, are adamantly opposed to police groups and associations using telemarketers in their fundraising efforts.  Again, the Illinois Sheriffs' Association never solicits by phone.  Should you receive a call from someone saying they represent your local sheriff or the Illinois Sheriffs' Association and are asking for donations contact the Sheriffs Office immediately or gather as much information as you can from the caller and report it to the Illinois Sheriffs' Association at ISA@ilsheriff.org

REMEMBER THESE TELEMARKETING TIPS:

 

  • Offers too good to be true usually are. Ask to receive the “unbelievable deal” or the “amazing prize offer” in writing so you can read it carefully before making a commitment.

  • Never give out your personal information over the phone or Internet unless you have initiated the contact. Legitimate business callers will never ask you for this information over the phone.

  • If a caller asks you to pay for an offer in advance or asks for your credit card number or Social Security number, tell the person you don’t give out personal information over the telephone.

  • Remember that legitimate telemarketers won’t be turned off if you use these techniques. They will appreciate dealing with an educated consumer. It’s not rude – it’s shrewd!

Evangelical Covenant Church announces Holy Week Services

The Evangelical Covenant Church in Princeton invites all to attend their Holy Week services beginning with Palm Sunday on April 14th at 9:00 a.m.  Come and enjoy special music by our adult choir and the children of the church and hear about Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem.

At 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 18th, our Maundy Thursday Service will be held.  This is a worship service for all ages commemorating the night of Jesus’ arrest and will include a celebration of Holy Communion.  

 

Our Good Friday Service begins at 6:30 pm on Friday, April 19th.  This simple service reminds us of Jesus’s death for our sins, with stripping of the altar by our confirmation students.  

On Easter, Sunday, April 21st, there will be two Easter Services celebrating the resurrection of Jesus Christ.  The services will be at 8:30 am and at 10:30 am and will include special music. Separate kids’ programming will be available during the sermon for ages pre-K (5 years old) through 6th grade.

 

Please join us during one of these Holy Week services.  Child care (ages birth through 4 years of age) will be provided at all worship services except for the Maundy Thursday service.

Additional opportunities for worship are every Sunday during the regular morning worship at 9:00 AM.  The Evangelical Covenant Church is located at 24 N. Main in Princeton. For more information, visit www.eccprinceton.org  or call 815-875-2124.

IVCC Diversity Team hosts Orthodox Christianity presentation April 29

Illinois Valley Community College’s Diversity Team sponsors “Orthodox Christianity: Light from the East,” presented by Father Andrew Kishler, pastor of St. George Orthodox Church in Spring Valley, from noon to 1 p.m. Monday, April 29 in Room C316.

 

 This is rescheduled from the original January date which was cancelled due to inclement weather.

 

Part of the team’s religious diversity series, this free presentation about the Orthodox Christian faith includes some of the icons and artifacts from the church. The public is welcome.

 

St. George is the only Eastern Orthodox Church in the Illinois Valley. Father Kishler received a B.A. in Bible and Religion from Malone University in Canton, Ohio, and a Master of Divinity from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield.

 

Father Kishler converted to Orthodoxy in October 2000, and has been a priest since 2011.  He lives in Spring Valley with his wife Patty and their six children.

For information, contact Amanda Cook Fesperman at (815) 224-0203.

 

Friends Of Extension and 4-H

The Friends of Extension & 4-H who help to support outreach educational programs for University of Illinois Extension – Bureau County and its 4-H/Youth Development Program is pleased to invite individuals to participate in a cash raffle fund raiser.

 

Four cash prizes will be awarded ($2,500., $1,000., $500. $250.) on Friday, June 14.  A ticket can be yours for a $50. donation or for a $100. donation you will receive 3 tickets!  All monies raised from the event will be used to support the 4-H and Extension educational programs in Bureau County.

 

The winning tickets will be drawn June 14, 2019 at the Becker Professional Building, 850 Thompson Street, Princeton, IL at 2:00 p.m.

 

For more information, or to request tickets, contact the Extension office at 815-875-2878.  The fund raiser is sponsored by Bureau County Friends of Extension & 4-H and the Bureau County Home and Community Education Association.

 

University of Illinois Extension provides educational programs and services in the following broad program areas:  youth development (including the 4-H Program); family, nutrition & consumer sciences; community and economic development; and agriculture and natural resources (including Master Gardener and Master Naturalist programs and community service projects). Youth programs include but are not limited to: 4-H community clubs; 4-H Cloverbud clubs; 4-H special interest clubs such as Horsebowl & Hippology, Dog Obedience, Fashion Board, 4-H Federation, school enrichment education programs, career exploration and preparation, summer camps and more!  Programming in other areas include but are not limited to community & economic development programs,  Master Gardener/Master Naturalist Programs & services, parent and child care education programs, private pesticide applicator training programs, in-depth ag workshops, and many cooperative programs and sharing of educational resources with schools and other not-for-profit agencies.  University of Illinois Extension – Bureau County also works hand-in-hand with the county's Home and Community Education Association (H.C.E.) to provide educational lessons that are re-taught by H.C.E. members across Bureau County.

 

This not-for-profit educational outreach service from University of Illinois Extension focuses on addressing local needs, issues and concerns with unbiased, practical, research based information and programs from the University of Illinois and the nation's land grant education system.  The Bureau County Extension Office is a part of the University of Illinois Extension - Bureau, LaSalle, Marshall, Putnam Unit.

 

 A volunteer Multi-County Unit Council meets on a regular basis to oversee all program and fiscal operations.  Local programs are determined by the volunteer Unit Advisory Council. University of Illinois Extension provides equal opportunities in programs and employment.

   

The program would not be possible without the financial support of our annual funders and individual donors.  All local and county support is needed and greatly appreciated. All donations are directed to local programs and services.

 

Rotary Fundraiser

The Rotary Club of Princeton will be teaming up with the Princeton Culver's on Tuesday April 16 from 5 to 8 pm for a special Share the Night Fundraiser. The proceeds will benefit PHS scholarships that are awarded annually to PHS graduating seniors. Rotary club members will be on hand to greet, clean tables, run orders to the drive through and dining room. We are also there to welcome and thank Culver's customers for supporting our PHS students. 

Culver's is located at 224 Ace road in Princeton. 

Rezin Bill Heightens Protections For Those With Pre-existing Conditions

 Legislation, sponsored by State Senator Sue Rezin (R-Morris), which seeks to better protect the healthcare of Illinoisans passed the Senate on Thursday, April 4.

 

Senate Bill 2026 provides a heightened protection for individuals with pre-existing conditions by prohibiting the State of Illinois from applying for a federal waiver that would reduce or eliminate any protection under the Affordable Care Act unless it is approved by the General Assembly.

 

“Last year, states were given the option to waive key provisions of the federal healthcare law,” said Sen. Rezin. “The fear is that applying for these waivers could have a detrimental effect on people with pre-existing conditions. I want to give those individuals as much peace of mind as possible that they will not lose their coverage.”

 

SB 2026 now head to the House of Representatives for consideration

Truck Driver Training Classes Available at IVCC Beginning April 29 and May 13

Illinois Valley Community College offers “Truck Driver Training,” a 10-credit course from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday beginning Monday, April 29. 

 

The four-week, 160-hour program combines classroom presentation and hands-on experience leading to a class “A” commercial driver’s license (CDL) with all endorsements. Students will experience behind-the-wheel training as well as log book, map reading, backing, shifting and maneuvering skills – competencies that allow them to obtain employment in entry-level positions in the trucking industry. IVCC’s program also provides lifetime placement assistance and has a 99 percent placement rate.

 

Evening classes are from 5 to 10 p.m. Monday through Friday for six weeks beginning Tuesday, May 13.

 

CDL Refresher classes are available for drivers who need to update their driving skills before going back to a driving job or are required to retake the written tests to renew their CDL.

No prerequisites or prior experience required; financial aid is available. For information, call Bruce Hartman, program coordinator, at (815) 224-0266.  

 

Perry Memorial Hospital Foundation Dine and Learn Events

Perry Memorial Hospital Foundation announces two spring community Dine and Learn events to be held in April and May.  The Foundation is committed to the community and supporting The Perry Way. Check your schedule and plan to attend one or both.  

 

Let’s start the conversation, making your wishes known with family & friends. Topics will include the importance of an advance directive.  Perry’s Care Management Team will provide the thought and guidance for your consideration. Lunch is FREE. Tuesday, April 16, 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Lower Level Conference Room.

 

Heart & Stroke Prevention  - Making Healthy Choices for Heart & Brain Health presentations provided by  Michelle Cusack, APRN, Illinois Neurological Institute and Dr. Mauro Montevecchi, OSF Cardiovascular Institute.  Dinner is FREE. Wednesday, May 15, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Chapel Hill Golf Course, 12927 County Road 26, and Princeton.

 

Michelle Cusack, APRN, CNP received in 2008 her Bachelors of Science in Nursing from OSF Saint Francis College of Nursing and her Masters of Science Nursing from the University of Illinois at Chicago in 2015. In 2017, Michelle joined the OSF Saint Francis, stroke team as a Stroke Advanced Practice Provider.  She provides consultations with new inpatients from the Emergency Department providing inpatient stroke services. Managing the patient with neurological disease and deficits is her passion.


 

Pre-Registration is required for the Dine and Learn events, call Cathy Foes, Perry Memorial Hospital Foundation President, 815- 876.4481.

 

University of Illinois Extension hosts Mindful Eating at Ottawa Center April 30

University of Illinois Extension hosts “Mindful Eating Nutrition and Wellness Program” from 12:15 to 1 p.m. Tuesday, April 30 at Ottawa Center, 321 W. Main St.

 

This free lunch and learn program is led by nutrition and wellness educator Susan Glassman and will cover how to be mindful with what and how you eat, how choices affect health, how to practice mindfulness to increase awareness of positive eating behaviors and meditation.

    

Advance registration is due by April 26 and a minimum of ten participants is required.

To register, call the Extension at (815) 224-0889 or visit https://go.illinois.edu/mindful.

 

SENATE WEEK IN REVIEW: April 1-5, 2019

Citizens and advocacy groups from across the state crowded the Capitol during the week, voicing their support or opposition to hundreds of bills currently being considered by lawmakers.

 

Senators spent many hours debating and voting on legislation – such as measures to combat the opioid crisis and to provide a more affordable alternative to medicine for treating allergic reactions – as they work to meet an April 12 deadline for the third reading of Senate bills.

Also during the week, state officials and lawmakers urged motorists to pay more attention and be more careful while driving, as distracted-driving accidents resulted in the deaths of two Illinois State Police officers in just three days.

 

Advocacy groups in Springfield

Hundreds of Illinois students visited the Capitol April 3 to view state government in action and talked with legislators about issues, as part of the Illinois Electric and Telephone Cooperatives Youth Day.  The annual event in Springfield focuses on encouraging young people, who are tomorrow’s leaders, to take an interest in state government.

Also on April 3, healthcare leaders from around the state presented information about their community programs as part of the Illinois Health and Hospital Association’s Quality Advocacy Showcase.  The event gives local healthcare leaders the opportunity to talk with legislators about how hospitals are improving patient safety and enhancing quality care, while reducing healthcare costs.

 

Combatting opioid crisis

The Senate has taken another major step in combatting the opioid overdose epidemic by passing legislation to treat the deadly drug Fentanyl as seriously as heroin.

Senate Bill 199 creates a Class 1 felony penalty structure for the possession of Fentanyl and Fentanyl analogs, targeted at illegal dealers and suppliers of the drug.  The goal is to put Fentanyl offenses on the same level as heroin, and to help prosecute those who are engaged in the illegal manufacturing and trade of the deadly drug.

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid originally developed as a painkiller.  Experts say the drug is 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine.  Fentanyl is now the drug most frequently involved in overdose deaths in the United States, according to a 2018 study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

Senate Bill 199 is currently awaiting action in the House after being passed by a unanimous vote in the Senate.

 

EpiPen alternatives

Health insurance companies would be required to offer generic alternatives for EpiPens under legislation that passed by a unanimous vote of the Senate on April 4.

EpiPen is the brand name of a device that delivers the drug epinephrine, which is a life-saving medication used when someone is experiencing a severe allergic reaction.  The cost for this drug, which can be in the hundreds of dollars range, often places it out of reach to those who need it most.

 

Senate Bill 2047 would require health insurance companies to offer generic alternatives for insulin auto-injectors.  The bill now heads to the House of Representatives for consideration.

 

Making our roads safer 

State officials and lawmakers are asking the public to slow down and drive more carefully after two Illinois State Police officers were killed in recent distracted-driving accidents.

Trooper Gerald Ellis was on duty March 30 when he was killed in a head-on collision with a vehicle traveling the wrong way on Interstate 94. Two days earlier, on March 28, Trooper Brooke Jones-Story was struck and killed by a semitrailer during a roadside inspection of another truck, just west of Illinois Route 75.

 

Their deaths brought to three the number of troopers killed in 2019.  On Jan. 12, Trooper Christopher Lambert was killed after being hit by a car on I-294 while at the scene of an accident.

 

Lawmakers from around the state are expressing concern about the number of troopers who have been hit by vehicles – 16 so far in 2019.  In 2018, just eight troopers were hit; 12 were hit in 2017; and five in 2016.

 

Illinois Acting State Police Director Brendan Kelly and the Governor are urging motorists to obey Scott’s Law, which mandates that when approaching any police or other emergency vehicle stopped along the roadway, drivers must proceed with due caution, change lanes if possible, and reduce their speed.

 

State Police have also stepped up enforcement of Scott’s Law and are trying to raise awareness of the issue through social media.

 

Weaver welcomes Youth Advisory Council to Capitol

Fifty students from 18 high schools in central Illinois came to Springfield April 3 to experience first-hand the workings of their state government, as part of Senator Chuck Weaver’s Youth Advisory Council.

 

The students were recommended by officials from their respective schools to participate in the program, which initially met on Dec. 6 at Bradley University in Peoria.

 

“Bringing these fine young men and women to Springfield gives them a hands-on view of state government. They get a better idea of the lawmaking process and what is involved,” said Weaver. “This experience complements their classroom education as they see in action what they have learned about government from their teachers.”

 

On April 3, the students began their day with Senator Weaver and other legislative officials in the Senate Chambers, then heard presentations by different professional occupations involved in the lawmaking process, from lobbyists to legislative staff members.

Students then took on the roles of lawmakers, concerned citizens, lobbyists, and reporters in a mock committee hearing to debate and vote on a proposed amendment to the Illinois Constitution setting term limits for lawmakers – a topic they chose at their first Youth Advisory Council (YAC) meeting on Dec.6. 

 

After hearing testimony from the students serving as lobbyists and concerned citizens, the students serving as lawmakers proposed an amendment to their bill before voting on the issue.

 

“These young people discuss and debate their issue, listen to the input of citizens and other groups concerned about the outcome of the legislation, then work together to come to a compromise,” said Weaver. “This experience also provides them with the kinds of skills that will serve them well as they continue to develop into our future leaders.”

Two of the participants from Dunlap High School, Joshua Palinkas and Megan Walters, said the April 3 YAC event in Springfield gave them unique insight into government, as well as provided professional development opportunities like public speaking and networking with students from other schools in their region.

 

“I wanted to come to the Youth Advisory Council because I saw it as a great way for me to not only network with politicians in my area, but gain a greater understanding of government and meet new people who have similar interests to my own,” Palinkas said. “It is important for people my age to understand the governmental process.”

 

When asked if he would recommend the YAC to other students, Palinkas responded, “Absolutely. Totally worth it. You learn a lot. Hands down, I would recommend it.”

 

Walters said the YAC expanded her perspective about the role of young people in government.

“I wanted to come to the Youth Advisory Council because in high school, we hear about these problems and we hear our parents talk about it, and our teachers talk about it, but I don’t think we ever feel like we have a voice or an opportunity to change it. So coming here and learning about the processes gives us the education to make a change … feel like we have a voice and that our opinions matter here in the State of Illinois,” Walters said.

 

“You see the things on the news in Springfield, or the issues in Chicago or even in D.C. seem so far away. But really, especially with social media, your state politicians are just a phone call away. They care about your opinion and they want you to be informed,” Walters added. “We are the next generation and they want us to be involved in these things.”

For more information about Senator Weaver’s Youth Advisory Council, contact his district office at 309-693-4921.

TEACHER OF THE MONTH: Jim Bixby at Peoria Regional Learning Center

We all have the teacher who we can say changed the path of our life. Jim Bixby has been that person for so many high school students.

Jim is the administrator in charge of enrollment and retention at the Peoria Regional Learning Center.

 

Jim graduated from Bradley University with a B.S. in secondary education and a M.A. in Guidance, Counseling and Supervision. He has served as a school principal, school counselor, director of counseling, college counselor, college instructor, college director of transfer services, college director of enrollment management and college dean of student services. He has 10 years of experience working in an alternative school environment.

 

When asked about Jim’s impact as an educator, one person said “For a person like me, there was a fine line between prison and success and Jim helped me understand that line and stay on the right side of it.”

 

Thank you, Jim, for your incredible love and passion for our youth. Your dedication is an inspiration to all!     

 

If you are interested in nominating an educator for Teacher of the Month, call our district office at 309-693-4921.

 

NAWBO sponsors “Fireside Chat with Chuck” on April 17

The National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO) Central Illinois Chapter will be hosting a “Fireside Chat with Chuck” on April 17, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Mt Hawley Country Club, 7724 North Knoxville Avenue, in Peoria.

 

“Fireside Chat with Chuck” is an opportunity for you to learn about what is happening in state government and our communities, ask questions and offer suggestions. Please come by and bring a friend, coworker, staff, and/or spouse.

 

NAWBO meetings are open to members and guests. Social/networking time begins at 5:30 pm and dinner begins at 6:00 pm with the program following.

 

Participants must register by April 15. For more information, please contact secretary@nawbo-cil.org, or call 309-692-2225 and leave a message.

 

IVCC hosts Exploring Careers in Manufacturing and Engineering Technology

Illinois Valley Community College’s Workforce Development hosts “Exploring Careers in Manufacturing and Engineering Technology” from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 9.

 

Dean of Workforce Development Shane Lange will discuss the numerous opportunities for hands-on coursework in IVCC’s one or two year certificates and degrees that lead to high-paying jobs.

Potential students will also meet with an IVCC counselor about Career and Technical Education courses to help make their goals a reality.

 

RSVP at www.ivcc.edu/events; call (815) 224-0233 for information.

 

Rezin bill ensures patients have affordable options to EpiPens

Health insurance companies would be required to offer generic alternatives for EpiPens under legislation sponsored by State Senator Sue Rezin (R-Morris). Senate Bill 2047 passed the Senate unanimously on Thursday, April 4.

 

EpiPen is the brand name of a device that delivers the drug epinephrine, which is a life-saving medication used when someone is experiencing a severe allergic reaction. Cost for this drug, which can be in the hundreds of dollars range, often place it out of reach to those who need it most.

 

SB 2047 would also require health insurance companies to offer generic alternatives for insulin auto-injectors.

 

“These life-saving drugs can be extremely expensive for those who need them,” said Sen. Rezin. “Generic forms are often much more affordable. This legislation seeks to ensure patients are provided with all available options at a price within reason.”

 

SB 2047 now heads to the House of Representatives for consideration.

Ottawa Center hosts Criminal Justice information session April 17

Police officers will be granted nine credit hours toward an Illinois Valley Community College criminal justice degree or certificate, Criminal Justice Program Coordinator Kevin Hermes announced today.

 

Beginning this fall, State of Illinois-certified officers will be eligible for the credit hours, Hermes said. Criminal Justice will host an Information Session 5:30 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 17 at Ottawa Center, 321 W. Main St., to discuss that program enhancement and other topics.

 

“We are pleased to recognize the education certified police officers have completed. These credits will bring them closer to completing their degree or certificate, advancing them in their current job or leading to another criminal justice field,” said Hermes.

 

The credits are for CRJ 2010 Criminal Investigation, CRJ 2020 Criminal Law, and one, three-credit elective option within a criminal justice program.To qualify, students must provide documentation showing completion of no less than 560 hours of basic police academy training from an Illinois Law Enforcement Training and Standards Board police academy. Documentation includes police academy transcript and a copy of the state of Illinois Peace Officer Certification.

 

Regarding the information session, Hermes said, “Current high school or IVCC students, potential students and police officers are all welcome to attend to learn about our program, the different fields within criminal justice and changes to the program.

“Criminal justice goes beyond the squad car. From court reporting to private security to community relations, there’s something for everyone to better serve the community,” he said. 

             

RSVP at www.ivcc.edu/events. Call Hermes for information at (815) 224-0491.

Weaver welcomes Youth Advisory Council to Capitol

 Fifty-five students from 22 high schools in central Illinois came to Springfield April 3 to experience first-hand the workings of their state government, as part of State Sen. Chuck Weaver’s Youth Advisory Council.

 

The students were recommended by officials from their respective schools to participate in the program, which initially met on Dec. 6 at Bradley University in Peoria.

 

“Bringing these fine young men and women to Springfield gives them a hands-on view of state government. They get a better idea of the lawmaking process and what is involved,” said Weaver (R-Peoria). “This experience complements their classroom education as they see in action what they have learned about government from their teachers.”

 

On April 3, the students first met with Sen. Weaver and other legislative officials in the Senate Chambers, then heard presentations by different professional occupations involved in the lawmaking process, from lobbyists to legislative staff members.

 

Students then took on the roles of lawmakers, concerned citizens, lobbyists, and reporters in a mock committee hearing to debate and vote on a proposed amendment to the Illinois Constitution setting term limits for lawmakers – a topic they chose at their first Youth Advisory Council (YAC) meeting on Dec. 6. 

 

After hearing testimony from the students serving as lobbyists and concerned citizens, the students serving as lawmakers proposed an amendment to their bill before voting on the issue.

 

“These young people discuss and debate their issue, listen to the input of citizens and other groups concerned about the outcome of the legislation, then work together to come to a compromise,” said Weaver. “This experience also provides them with the kinds of skills that will serve them well as they continue to develop into our future leaders.”

 

Two of the participants from Dunlap High School, Joshua Palinkas and Megan Walters, said the April 3 YAC event in Springfield gave them unique insight into government, as well as provided professional development opportunities like public speaking and networking with students from other schools in their region.

 

“I wanted to come to the Youth Advisory Council because I saw it as a great way for me to not only network with politicians in my area, but gain a greater understanding of government and meet new people who have similar interests to my own,” Palinkas said. “It is important for people my age to understand the governmental process.”

 

When asked if he would recommend the YAC to other students, Palinkas responded, “Absolutely. Totally worth it. You learn a lot. Hands down, I would recommend it.”

 

Walters said the YAC expanded her perspective about the role of young people in government.

“I wanted to come to the Youth Advisory Council because in high school, we hear about these problems and we hear our parents talk about it, and our teachers talk about it, but I don’t think we ever feel like we have a voice or an opportunity to change it. So coming here and learning about the processes gives us the education to make a change … feel like we have a voice and that our opinions matter here in the State of Illinois,” Walters said.

 

“You see the things on the news in Springfield, or the issues in Chicago or even in D.C. seem so far away. But really, especially with social media, your state politicians are just a phone call away. They care about your opinion and they want you to be informed,” Walters added. “We are the next generation and they want us to be involved in these things.”

 

For more information about Sen. Weaver’s Youth Advisory Council, contact his district office at 309-693-4921

Stateline Favorite Camp McCormick Debuts Improved Facilities and Scenic Camp Grounds for Potential Summer Campers

Countless local Girl Scouts—past and present—have fond, sun-drenched memories of Camp McCormick, a treasured scenic camp property in the stateline area for decades! Camp McCormick encompasses nearly 400 acres of pristine wilderness and open prairies stretching along almost two miles of Rock River frontage. Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois (GSNI) will host a Summer Camp Open House for the community on Saturday, April 13, from 12:30–3:30 p.m., at Camp McCormick, located at 9995 North Girl Scout Road in Stillman Valley.

 

This free event is open to the public and will feature tours of new and improved Camp McCormick facilities, fun hands-on camp activities (including roasting s’mores!), along with a GSNI Rope Runners regional competition, presented by Danfoss! All interested Girl Scouts, potential Girl Scouts, and their families can learn which summer camp session is a good fit for their camper! Camp staff will be on hand to answer questions and accept camp registrations during the event!

 

For more information, email customercare@girlscoutsni.org, call 844-GSNI-4-ME, or visit www.girlscoutsni.org.

 

Why Camp?

Camping is a great way for girls to explore leadership, build skills, and develop a deep appreciation for nature. Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois has a variety of facilities—from tents and cabins to year-round lodges—that are available for Girl Scouts to create their own unique camping experience or join us for council-sponsored camping events where we provide the activities and supplies. With new activities and amenities at all our camps, there is something for every girl!

 

GSNI 10th Anniversary: Rooted in History. Rising into the Future.

 

Backed by over 100 years of proven Girl Scout experience, four Girl Scout councils joined hands in 2009 and promised to propel girl leadership into the future together! In 2019, Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois will mark ten vibrant years of putting girls first at the center of all we do—from all-girl fun and adventure to unprecedented leadership opportunities found nowhere else. We have kept our promise to girls, and we always will!

 

Join us as we celebrate with lively family and girl events in local communities where it all began! Be part of our 10th Anniversary events and earn our special 10th Anniversary fun patch—Water, Land, Air! Girl Scouts Go Everywhere!

 

GSNI’s 10th Anniversary events include Over the Edge 4 Girl Scouts and Air Fair at Pheasant Run Resort in St. Charles, on June 1, 2019; the 15th Annual Thin Mint Sprint at Harlem High School in Machesney Park, on September 21, 2019, and the 2nd Annual All-Girl and Family Fishing Derby and Water Whimsy at Rock Cut State Park in Loves Park on September 22. For more information, email customercare@girlscoutsni.org, call 844-GSNI-4-ME, or visit www.girlscoutsni.org.

 

Wondering Why Girl Scouts?

At Girl Scouts, girls are our first and only priority. And they always will be. See how girls prepare for leadership, adventure, and success at why.girlscouts.org. This dynamic digital experience showcases Girl Scouts as a powerhouse where girls develop key skills for a lifetime. Learn more at why.girlscouts.org today!

 

Girl Scouts don't just dream big; we take action. Are you ready to change the world with us? www.girlscouts.org/all

 

We’re Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois

We believe every girl can change the world. With us, Girl Scouts develop the independence and confidence to guide their own lives and build a better world. We put girls in the driver’s seat and encourage them to customize their own experience. With programs focused on the outdoors, career and interest exploration, travel and global community, and practical life skills, in addition to community service projects, every girl can unlock her full potential and be amazing!

 

We serve 16 counties including parts or all of Boone, Carroll, Cook, DeKalb, DuPage, Jo Daviess, Kane, Kendall, Lake, LaSalle, Lee, McHenry, Ogle, Stephenson, Whiteside, and Winnebago. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsni.org or call 844-GSNI-4-ME (844-476-4463).

 

Harvard's Mary Ann Beebe Center Shows Off New Adventure Amenities for Potential Summer Campers at Community Open House

Surprises are in store at Mary Ann Beebe Center’s Open House on Sunday, April 14, from 12:30–3:30 p.m., at 17501 Streit Road in Harvard! Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois will host a community open house to premiere changes to the camp, including much-needed road improvements, parking lot expansion, a bouldering wall, and exciting progress on a new zip line!

 

This free event is open to the public and will feature tours of new adventure amenities at Mary Ann Beebe Center, fun hands-on camp activities (including roasting s’mores!), along with a GSNI Rope Runners regional competition, presented by Danfoss! All interested Girl Scouts, potential Girl Scouts, and their families can learn which summer camp session is a good fit for their camper! Camp staff will be on hand to answer questions and accept camp registrations during the event!

 

For more information, email customercare@girlscoutsni.org, call 844-GSNI-4-ME, or visit www.girlscoutsni.org.

 

Why Camp?

Camping is a great way for girls to explore leadership, build skills, and develop a deep appreciation for nature. Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois has a variety of facilities—from tents and cabins to year-round lodges—that are available for Girl Scouts to create their own unique camping experience or join us for council-sponsored camping events where we provide the activities and supplies. With new activities and amenities at all our camps, there is something for every girl!

 

GSNI 10th Anniversary: Rooted in History. Rising into the Future.

 

Backed by over 100 years of proven Girl Scout experience, four Girl Scout councils joined hands in 2009 and promised to propel girl leadership into the future together! In 2019, Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois will mark ten vibrant years of putting girls first at the center of all we do—from all-girl fun and adventure to unprecedented leadership opportunities found nowhere else. We have kept our promise to girls, and we always will!

 

Join us as we celebrate with lively family and girl events in local communities where it all began! Be part of our 10th Anniversary events and earn our special 10th Anniversary fun patch—Water, Land, Air! Girl Scouts Go Everywhere!

 

GSNI’s 10th Anniversary events include Over the Edge 4 Girl Scouts and Air Fair at Pheasant Run Resort in St. Charles, on June 1, 2019; the 15th Annual Thin Mint Sprint at Harlem High School in Machesney Park, on September 21, 2019, and the 2nd Annual All-Girl and Family Fishing Derby and Water Whimsy at Rock Cut State Park in Loves Park on September 22. For more information, email customercare@girlscoutsni.org, call 844-GSNI-4-ME, or visit www.girlscoutsni.org.

 

Wondering Why Girl Scouts?

At Girl Scouts, girls are our first and only priority. And they always will be. See how girls prepare for leadership, adventure, and success at why.girlscouts.org. This dynamic digital experience showcases Girl Scouts as a powerhouse where girls develop key skills for a lifetime. Learn more at why.girlscouts.org today!

 

Girl Scouts don't just dream big; we take action. Are you ready to change the world with us? www.girlscouts.org/all

 

We’re Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois

We believe every girl can change the world. With us, Girl Scouts develop the independence and confidence to guide their own lives and build a better world. We put girls in the driver’s seat and encourage them to customize their own experience. With programs focused on the outdoors, career and interest exploration, travel and global community, and practical life skills, in addition to community service projects, every girl can unlock her full potential and be amazing!

 

We serve 16 counties including parts or all of Boone, Carroll, Cook, DeKalb, DuPage, Jo Daviess, Kane, Kendall, Lake, LaSalle, Lee, McHenry, Ogle, Stephenson, Whiteside, and Winnebago. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsni.org or call 844-GSNI-4-ME (844-476-4463).

 

IVCC receives $100,000 more from Weeg estate

The largest gift in Illinois Valley Community College’s 95-year history grew this week to $1.2 million as the college received an additional contribution from the estate of Dr. Mary Margaret Weeg.

 

Dr. Rose Marie Lynch, executor of the Weeg estate, presented IVCC President Jerry Corcoran with a check for $105,560, the remainder of the estate, to bring the final gift to more than $1.2 million.

 

Weeg, a longtime English instructor and humanities division chair, died April 19, 2015 at age 84. Following the first gift of $1.1 million in August 2017, the IVCC board named the college’s 600-seat auditorium the Dr. Mary Margaret Weeg Cultural Centre.

The bequest has endowed Dr. Mary Margaret Weeg Arts Scholarships, provided a major gift to the Scholarship Campaign of 2015-17, and will provide perpetual support for the Adult Education department, Student Emergency Living Needs Fund and IVCC Foundation operations.

 

“This monumental and unprecedented gift from a beloved professor and academic leader has had a profound impact on our institution and will continue to do so for generations,” said Corcoran.

 

Lynch, who was hired by Weeg in 1970 to teach English and journalism at IVCC, said, “This bequest is a tangible legacy, but Mary Margaret’s true legacy is in the thousands of students, teachers and friends she inspired with her love of language, literature, music, art and travel.”

Corcoran added, “How fitting it is that Mary would entrust Rosie, her protégé, to carry on her legacy this way. The bond of trust that existed between them was extraordinary and the college is the beneficiary of their compassion.”

 

Weeg retired in 1989 – 35 years after beginning her teaching career at La Salle-Peru High School and while also teaching part-time at IVCC predecessor La Salle-Peru-Oglesby Junior College.

 

In 1964, she was appointed chairman of LP’s English department and in 1967, when the IVCC district opened, was named chair of the college’s humanities division. She resigned that chair in 1980 to return to teaching full time.

 

Celebrating Around the World – IAHCE 2019

Four Bureau County Home and Community Education members attended the 94th Annual Illinois Association for Home and Community Education Conference held at the Thelma Keller Convention Center, Effingham, Illinois, on March 12-14, 2019.

 

    Through the years, we have changed with the current times, trends, or needs.  It was first known as Home Bureau Federation, the Homemakers Extension Association, and today, we are Home and Community Education.  Our goal is to educate members of our homes and community. We promote social and economic well-being in our homes and neighborhoods.  We are not our Mother’s Home Bureau anymore.

 

    IAHCE continues to cross the boundaries when providing unique and inventive ideas for our lessons providing members opportunity to learn current and relevant information.  We strive to provide our state and county officer’s important information that allows them to work, support and promote the community in which they serve.

 

    Our members attending this year’s conference were able to choose from twenty-five (25) different lessons.  Some share shops were: “Meals Around the World”, “Rattle Rattle Bang Bang- How Well Do You Know Your Vehicle?” and “Small Scale Gardening”. Members will be bringing all this information back to their own counties to share with members who could not attend the conference.

 

    For more information, call Marilyn at 815-659-3214.  The Bureau County HCE supports the University of Illinois Extension, 4-H programs.  For more information on HCE contact the Extension office at 815-875-2878.

 

Father-daughter team choreographs IVCC's "Mamma Mia!"

When the curtain goes up Thursday, April 18 on the Illinois Valley Community College Theatre Department’s production of “Mamma Mia!,” audiences familiar with the popular show know to expect high-voltage dancing. They also know the story is, ultimately, all about family, set to the 1980s songbook of ABBA.

 

Family is a familiar theme within IVCC’s artistic team as well. Lexi Zellmer of Peoria, commutes to rehearsals and serves as assistant choreographer to director, choreographer, and father, Don Grant Zellmer.

 

“We joke that our choreography styles are identical and that we steal each other’s ideas, but we really just have the same visions,” said Lexi. Don added, “It’s almost like we share a brain when it comes to dances. It must be genetic! We call it ‘Daddy-Daughterography.”

 

“Mamma Mia!” cast member and dancer, Ashley Hurst of Peru, said, “It’s very cool to see these two work together. Don will choreograph a dance, turn to Lexi to see how she likes it, and vice versa. They never disagree – just add to each other’s numbers.” She added, “Even their direction style is the same – definite and professional, but they both make the rehearsal process fun and rewarding for the cast.”

 

The two acknowledge that the cast has been dedicated. “This cast is so great to work with – talented and they save the drama for the stage. You can’t ask for a more genuine and hard-working group just doing what they love,” said Lexi. 

 

During one rehearsal, Don was teaching the “Gimme Gimme Gimme” number and wasn’t satisfied with the last part of his choreography. He would be gone the next rehearsal, so he turned to his daughter to see what she could do with it in his absence. “When I came back and saw it,” he said, “I couldn’t really tell where my choreography ended and Lexi’s began.”

 

Zellmer owned and operated Zellmer’s Dinner Theatre near Peoria for many years, starting when Lexi was a baby. He performed professionally for many years after he closed that operation, and Lexi grew up watching her parents perform.

 

“Growing up with dad as a director and actor made for a unique and exciting childhood,” she said.  “I’ve always admired his abilities to orchestrate a cast of people from all different talent levels and experiences. Now as a choreographer and dance coach myself, I appreciate even more his innate talents.”

 

Lexi has had extensive dance training, and when she was younger, danced competitively. She would share the stage on occasion with her dad at the dinner theatre, taking a role when a child was needed.

 

“Even when she was little and made a cameo or had a small part, she’d inform me I had to pay her like the rest of the cast,” said Zellmer. “I really thought she may grow up to be an agent at one point!”

 

“It is not only an honor to work with dad but a responsibility,” Lexi added. “Daughters always want to make their fathers proud and it hasn’t changed for me after 32 years. “

 

“That’s not an issue,” said Don. “She has made me a proud dad for so long. But it’s been a very long while since we’ve worked on a show together, so I really cherish this experience.”

While the commute can be tiring, this show has an added challenge for Lexi – she will become a first-time mother in just two months. “And yet,” said Don, “She’s dancing away like she always does.” He jokingly added, “Technically there are two and a half generations working on “Mamma Mia!”

 

Being a new mother won’t be slowing her down, however, as she is contracted to direct and choreograph East Peoria’s Eastlight Theatre production of “Mamma Mia!” with auditions in July. “Here we go again,” laughed Don. “Another little Zellmer growing up backstage!”

“Mamma Mia!” plays on the IVCC stage April 18 through April 28. Tickets are available online at www.ivcc.edu.

 

Election Results: Joel Quiram Wins The Race For Mayor; Robin Swift Concedes To Jerry Neumann

April 2nd was marked as election night in the city of Princeton as Joel Quiram and Ray Swanson dueled for the opportunity to be the Mayor of Princeton. When the ballots were counted Joel Quiram was re-elected by winning over 60% of the votes and will serve as Princeton Mayor for the next four years. We reached out to Mayor Quiram during our election coverage, who was happy with the result...

 

 

 

When asked if this was the result he expected, Mayor Quiram was confident in his response...

 

Also, the tax referendum that would increase the sales tax 0.25% to improve the cities infrastructure for the next ten years passed with 52% of the votes.

 

 

The race for city council was also a big part of our election night coverage and proved to be a highly contested race for two of the candidates. Hector Gomez was able collect over 28% of the votes to be one of the winners. When reached for comment Gomez was thankful for all of the support...

 

 When asked about the campaign Gomez stated that winning one of the city council seats was the highlight....

 

There was a ton of excitement during election night, but the second seat for city council turned out to be the most contested race of the night. With all of the votes counted Jerry Neumann and Robin Swift ended up being tied with 771 votes apiece. When Neumann was asked about what happens next, Neumann responded with surprise...

 

 

With wondering what will happen next to decide a winner for the second seat on city council, I talked to Robin Swift and she surprised everyone with what she said next.... 

 

With Swift conceding to Neumann, your city council members will include Neumann and Hector Gomez. 

 

It was a crazy night in Princeton and it will be one that won't be forgotten.

Route 6 Named After Kaszynski Brothers, WWII Veterans

 As a way to pay tribute to the six Kaszysnki brothers of Peru, who all served in World War II, State Senator Sue Rezin (R-Morris) hosted a ceremony Saturday, March 30 to officially name a section of Route 6 as the “Kaszynski Brothers Memorial Highway.”

 

“By naming this road after the Kaszysnki brothers, motorists will now always remember the sacrifices these veterans made to protect our nation,” said Sen. Rezin. “All six brothers are true American heroes. They embody what our country stands for, and it’s our responsibility to make sure that their sacrifices are never forgotten. It is my hope that by naming Route 6 the ‘Kaszynski Brothers Memorial Highway’ our community will remember this family now and for future generations to come.”

 

Sen. Rezin sponsored Senate Joint Resolution 25, which names Mary Street in Spring Valley to Harrison Street in Peru as the "Kaszynski Brothers Memorial Highway.”

The six brothers served all over the world during World War II in places such as Guadalcanal, Tangal, the Panama Canal Zone, New Guinea, the Philippines, and Iceland. Five of the brothers, Bernard, Florian, Thaddeus, Alex, and Richard served in the U.S. Army and one brother, Chester, served with the U.S. Merchant Marine.

 

Alex, was the only brother who was seriously wounded in action and was awarded the Purple Heart.

Girl Scouts Recruit Thrill-Seekers and Adventure Enthusiasts to Rappel at Over the Edge 4 Girl Scouts

Love to go rock climbing, rappelling, or hang gliding? If you love the air high up in the atmosphere, Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois (GSNI) has the unique adventure you’ve been craving! Over the Edge 4 Girl Scouts, presented by Jewel-Osco, provides outdoor explorers the opportunity to rappel 16 stories (140 feet) down the tower of Pheasant Run Resort in St. Charles while raising funds to help girls across northern Illinois benefit from a leadership experience designed just for them!

 

Over the Edge 4 Girl Scouts returns to Pheasant Run Resort on Saturday, June 1, 2019! Limited to the first 92 participants, individuals, ages 11 and older, raise proceeds through peer-to-peer and DIY fundraising with GSNI’s fundraising toolkit and specially-designed website. There is no experience or prior training needed in order to register!

 

The Over the Edge 4 Girl Scouts staff consists of a team of experts who provide the technical expertise, training, and equipment needed for the event. Visit www.girlscoutsni.org/ote to sign up, or check out ways to support local event rappelers with fundraising efforts at www.overtheedgegsni.com. Supporters can join girls as they gain confidence by trying something new, overcoming fear, and practice improving their skills. All proceeds raised through Over the Edge 4 Girl Scouts will provide membership and program assistance to current and future Girl Scouts in 16 local counties.

 

Over the Edge 4 Girl Scouts is generously sponsored by Jewel-Osco, BMO Wealth Advisors, Esser Hayes, Dugan & Lopatka CPAs, Elgin State Bank, Ashford Farms, QSP, Shaw Media, and Star 105.5. Additional sponsorship opportunities are currently available. Contact Nancy Ramos at 1-815-209-6550 or nramos@girlscoutsni.org for more information!

 

Air Fair 10th Anniversary Event Premiers at Over the Edge 4 Girl Scouts!

 

NEW! Air Fair is coming to Over the Edge 4 Girl Scouts! This air-and-space-themed family fun fair will debut on June 1, from 10 a.m.–3 p.m., at Pheasant Run Resort, celebrating the 10th Anniversary of Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois. The event will feature GSNI’s Rope Runner Finale, presented by Danfoss, along with exciting, hands-on activities from other family-friendly organizations! Air Fair is a free event, open to the public. A patch commemorating the event is available for $3. Participants must pre-register and pay to receive the patch. For more information or to pre-register, email customercare@girlscoutsni.org or call 844-GSNI-4-ME.

 

GSNI 10th Anniversary: Rooted in History. Rising into the Future.

 

Backed by over 100 years of proven Girl Scout experience, four Girl Scout councils joined hands in 2009 and promised to propel girl leadership into the future together! In 2019, Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois will mark ten vibrant years of putting girls first at the center of all we do—from all-girl fun and adventure to unprecedented leadership opportunities found nowhere else. We have kept our promise to girls, and we always will!

 

Join us as we celebrate with lively family and girl events in local communities where it all began! Be part of our 10th Anniversary events and earn our special 10th Anniversary fun patch—Water, Land, Air! Girl Scouts Go Everywhere!

 

GSNI’s 10th Anniversary events include Over the Edge 4 Girl Scouts and Air Fair at Pheasant Run Resort in St. Charles, on June 1, 2019; the 15th Annual Thin Mint Sprint at Harlem High School in Machesney Park, on September 21, 2019, and the 2nd Annual All-Girl and Family Fishing Derby and Water Whimsy at Rock Cut State Park in Loves Park on September 22. For more information, email customercare@girlscoutsni.org, call 844-GSNI-4-ME, or visit www.girlscoutsni.org.

 

Wondering Why Girl Scouts?

At Girl Scouts, girls are our first and only priority. And they always will be. See how girls prepare for leadership, adventure, and success at why.girlscouts.org. This dynamic digital experience showcases Girl Scouts as a powerhouse where girls develop key skills for a lifetime. Learn more at why.girlscouts.org today!

 

Girl Scouts don't just dream big; we take action. Are you ready to change the world with us? www.girlscouts.org/all

 

We’re Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois

We believe every girl can change the world. With us, Girl Scouts develop the independence and confidence to guide their own lives and build a better world. We put girls in the driver’s seat and encourage them to customize their own experience. With programs focused on the outdoors, career and interest exploration, travel and global community, and practical life skills, in addition to community service projects, every girl can unlock her full potential and be amazing!

 

We serve 16 counties including parts or all of Boone, Carroll, Cook, DeKalb, DuPage, Jo Daviess, Kane, Kendall, Lake, LaSalle, Lee, McHenry, Ogle, Stephenson, Whiteside, and Winnebago. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsni.org or call 844-GSNI-4-ME (844-476-4463).

 

Sen. Weaver to host area high school students for Youth Advisory Council

An estimated 60 students from 22 high schools in central Illinois will travel to Springfield April 3 to experience first-hand the working of their state government, as part of State Sen. Chuck Weaver’s Youth Advisory Council.

 

The students will meet with Sen. Weaver and other lawmakers in the Senate, and will also hear presentations by different professional occupations involved in the lawmaking process, from lobbyists to reporters to legislative staff members.

 

Students will then take on the roles of lawmakers, concerned citizens, lobbyists, and reporters in a mock committee hearing to discuss, debate, and vote on legislation that they developed during a Youth Advisory Council meeting last fall

IVCC hosts tribute to A Monument for the Anxious and Hopeful

Illinois Valley Community College has created a version of A Monument for the Anxious and Hopeful, a gathering place for the IVCC community, students, staff, and faculty to anonymously share their hopes and fears through Wednesday, April 3 in the common area near Room E208.

The tribute is inspired by A Monument for the Anxious and Hopeful by Chang and Reeves, recently displayed at The Rubin in New York, N.Y.

 

Participants are encouraged to fill out cards and to read what others have written with the hope they will realize none of us are truly alone; our humanity connects us all. Contact Quintin_Overocker@ivcc.edu or Patrice_Hess@ivcc.edu

SENATE WEEK IN REVIEW: March 25-29, 2019

Senate Republicans offered a constitutional amendment during the week to give Illinois residents a stronger voice in proposed tax increases, as lawmakers acted on legislation that will provide cost-savings measures, and resolve issues with out-of-date mandates.

In other news, thousands of 2nd Amendment gun rights advocates came to Springfield for the annual Illinois Gun Owner Lobby Day.

Also during the week, the Illinois Department of Public Health urged residents in and around flood zones in northern Illinois to take precautions as the clean-up begins after historic flooding forced hundreds of people from their homes.

 

Senate Republican initiative to protect middle-class taxpayers

 

Members of the Senate Republican Caucus unveiled a proposal on March 26 that could give a stronger voice to Illinois voters regarding new tax proposals and potential increases.

Senate Joint Resolution-Constitutional Amendment 12, which I am cosponsoring, proposes an amendment to Illinois’ Constitution that would require any increased state tax or new tax or fee to be approved by a two-thirds super-majority vote in both the Senate and House of Representatives.  Currently, legislators only need a simple majority to pass a tax increase or to implement a new tax.

 

A three-fifths majority vote of lawmakers is required to put Senate Joint Resolution-Constitutional Amendment 12 on the ballot in 2020.  For the amendment to be adopted, voters must approve it on the ballot with three-fifths of those voting on the question or a majority of those voting in the election.

If placed on the ballot and approved by voters, the amendment would require 40 votes in the Senate and 79 votes in the House to pass any new state tax or any state tax increase.

 

2nd Amendment supporters march in Springfield

 

Thousands of people supporting 2nd Amendment gun rights marched in Springfield on March 27 as part of the annual Illinois Gun Owner Lobby Day (IGOLD).

I stand with these citizens as a strong supporter of 2nd Amendment rights.

The advocates expressed their opposition to increasingly restrictive gun laws, as well as pending legislation seeking to further tighten regulations, which they say penalize law-abiding gun owners but do not stop criminals from getting guns.

 

Add ‘zipper merge’ method to Rules of the Road

 

Legislation that makes an effort to keep traffic flowing, prevent backups and promote safety passed the Senate during the week.  Senate Bill 2038 would require the Secretary of State’s Office to add information on how to properly merge into one lane of traffic to its Illinois Rules of the Road guide.

 

Under the legislation, the “zipper merge” method would be required to be taught to drivers.  Experts believe this is the proper and most efficient way to merge multiple lanes of traffic, as drivers utilize both lanes until they reach the point that one lane narrows.  Drivers then take turns merging with the other lane of traffic, creating a zipper-like effect.

Proponents note that studies show that merging early only creates one single long line and slows traffic because it minimizes the amount of usable road.  The “zipper merge” method, on the other hand, uses two lanes of roadway for as long as possible.

 

Stop exploitation of seniors, citizens with disabilities

 

Lawmakers are clamping down on those who financially exploit senior citizens and citizens with disabilities.

 

Senate Bill 69 would provide tougher penalties for those who prey upon our most vulnerable populations, and also make it easier to identify those with a history of this criminal activity.

The legislation expands the venue for the offense of “financial exploitation of an elderly person or a person with a disability,” to make it easier to prosecute perpetrators who live in a different state or facility than the victim.  The bill also makes “theft by deception from a person with a disability” a Class 2 felony, which could carry prison time and penalties.

It also prohibits sealing the records of certain offenses where someone was convicted of a financial crime against the elderly, along with eliminating the “consent” defense if the defendant knew the elderly or disabled person lacked the capacity to consent.

Senate Bill 69 was passed by the Senate March 27, and now moves to the House.

 

Common-sense changes in recordkeeping

 

The state could soon save schools money by updating outdated regulations for record-keeping and the outlined process for destroying old records.

 

Under current law, schools are required to keep certain types of records for various periods of time—some for as many as 60 years.  After that, they cannot be disposed of or transitioned to electronic format unless the district is able to contact the parent of the student and offer them a chance to first copy the information on record.  Current standard practice is to attempt contact parents by mail or publish a notice in the local newspaper.

 

The proposed updates in Senate Bill 117 would allow the school district to instead, send notice via email with receipt confirmation and also allow the communications to go to the former student.  Burdens in the current law often mean school districts are incurring unnecessary costs or forced to house records for much longer than necessary.

Senate Bill 117 was passed by the Senate March 27, and now moves to the House.

 

Health and safety tips for residents affected by floods

 

After historic flooding in Winnebago and Stephenson counties forced hundreds of people from their homes, the State of Illinois is urging residents in and around the flood zones to take precautions as the clean-up begins.

 

The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) is warning residents in these areas against the potential harm floodwaters and sewer overflows can bring, including bacteria, viruses and other organisms that may cause disease.  The Illinois Emergency Management Agency, Illinois Environmental Protection Agency, and IDPH provide important guidance for residents looking to return home and begin damage assessments.

 

More information is available on the state’s Ready Illinois Web site at  https://www2.illinois.gov/ready/Pages/default.aspx.

 

Business of the Month: Brewers Distributing in Peoria

 

The Weaver Team recently stopped by Brewers Distributing Company in Peoria to meet with Jim Waller and Steve Aden.

 

Jim Waller, known as “Jimmy” when we were at Wilder Waite Elementary School in the 60s, and Steve Aden are true to the Jacob’s Family tradition. These guys care about their employees and our community, and are involved with so many charities. They have supported a number of events Laurie and I have hosted at our farm, and always provide great service. We thank them for that!

 

Brewers Distributing Company was established shortly after the repeal of Prohibition in 1933. Walter F. (Budd) Jacob worked for Anheuser-Busch for over 20 years prior to purchasing Brewers Distributing Company as a partner in 1974. In 1978, Budd purchased the remaining shares of Brewers to become the sole owner. Budd, along with his children, George, Margaret and Paul currently own Brewers. Congratulations to Brewers for being our Business of the Month.

 

If you are interested in the Weaver Team visiting your business, call our district office at 309-693-4921.

IVCC Foundation hosts third Giving Day April 3

The Spirit Sprint Relay Challenge and Slime Challenge are among the highlights of the Illinois Valley Community College Foundation’s third annual Giving Day from noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday, April 3 in the gym.

 

All proceeds will benefit the Foundation’s core mission: providing access to IVCC to students-in-need. The first Giving Day in April 2017 netted $23,500 thanks in part to title sponsor Hometown National Bank of La Salle, again the sponsor in 2019 with its $3,000 gift.

Seven teams comprised of students, faculty and staff will compete in the first Spirit Sprint Relay Challenge. In the challenge, teams will compete in a series of five tasks to see who finishes first.

 

Rounding out the event is the Slime Challenge where employees Quintin Overocker, Vince Brolley, Kyle Fogle, Aseret Loveland and Cynthia Cardosi will vie for the ‘privilege’ of being slimed. The employee raising the most contributions will have a bucket of slime dumped on their head. The slime is being created by Chem Club students.

 

Winners of the Hamilton and White Sox ticket raffles will be drawn.

Free pizza will be provided by Pizzas by Marchelloni in Peru, free popcorn is courtesy of IVCC athletics and Pepsi will provide free water to all at the Giving Day III event.

Raffle tickets are still available for two top prizes: two Hamilton tickets plus parking pass for the June 5 matinee performance at the CIBC Theatre and four White Sox tickets plus parking pass courtesy of WCMY.

 

Raffle tickets are $5 each or 3-for-$10 and can be purchased in the Foundation office (C202) or by calling Janice Corrigan at (815) 224-0253.

 

To make a Giving Day donation visit www.ivcc.edu/givingday, or call Corrigan.

The IVCC Foundation awards about 250 scholarships annually and has distributed over $1 million in scholarships the past four years combined.

 

BHHA is Back to Its Normal Hours for 2019

Starting Monday April 1, the Steeple Building Museum will now be open Mondays thru Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturdays noon to 4 p.m., and Sundays 1 to 3 p.m.  The Steeple Building Museum contain two floors of displays about Bishop Hill history.  Most of the artifacts are from the 19th century.  The Albert Krans Livery Stable will be open Mondays thru Fridays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on weekends during special events.  This museum contacts early 20th century buggies, harnesses, tools, and more.  The Spets Stuga will be open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays, with Friday April 5 being opening day.  The Spets Stuga is a children’s playhouse with a pioneer theme, located next to the Dairy Building.  

 

All these buildings are open to the public, with freewill donations being accepted.  For more details, please call the Bishop Hill Heritage Association at 309 927-3899 or email bhha@mymctc.net.