Local News

SENATE WEEK IN REVIEW: April 15-19, 2019

State lawmakers are working back in their districts until April 30, when they return to Springfield to finish the spring legislative session, which is scheduled to adjourn May 31.

So far this legislative session, several measures sponsored by Senate Republicans have advanced to the House of Representatives after receiving approval from the Senate, including a bill that increases awareness of Scott’s Law.

 

To promote on-the-job safety for Illinois State Troopers, the Senate has passed legislation that would require the Secretary of State to include information about Scott’s Law with every vehicle registration notice it sends to motorists. 

 

Senate Bill 947 is an effort to make Illinois’ roadways safer by informing drivers about Scott’s Law, which states that drivers must move over, if possible, and slow down when approaching an emergency vehicle stopped along the roadway.

 

The legislation is a response to the recent tragic deaths of three Illinois State Troopers who have been hit in accidents while their cars have been stopped along the roadway. The number of Troopers hit by vehicles has drastically increased in 2019, with 16 reported incidents in the past three months. In 2018, eight troopers were hit; 12 were hit in 2017; and five in 2016.

Scott’s Law, enacted in 2002, is named after Lieutenant Scott Gillen of the Chicago Fire Department, who was struck and killed by an intoxicated driver while assisting at a crash on the Dan Ryan Expressway.

 

A person who violates Scott’s Law can be fined up to $10,000.

 

COWL’s $2,500 scholarship program for women

 

The Conference of Women Legislators (COWL) is encouraging Illinois women who are seeking to earn undergraduate college degrees, to apply for one of their $2,500 scholarships. Applicants must be ages 25 or older.

 

COWL is a bipartisan, bicameral, nonprofit organization of women legislators in the Illinois General Assembly. The group’s yearly Scholarship Award Program is a part of its mission to promote economic independence, community service, and leadership development.

Scholarship applicants are required to enroll in an Illinois accredited college or university for a minimum of six credit hours to qualify, making the scholarships available to part-time and online students.

 

Applications must be postmarked or emailed by April 30. Awardees will be notified by May 31.

More information and application materials can be found at https://cowlil.com/programs/.

IEMA tips for disaster recovery

 

April is Recovery Preparedness Month, and IEMA has released a guide to help residents be prepared to quickly and efficiently recover from weather-related disasters like recent flooding at levels many northwestern Illinois communities have not seen in decades.

Here are five tips from IEMA:

 

  • Get Organized. Secure and organize financial and critical personal, household, and medical information. Having these items in a safe place can expedite insurance claims and other emergency expenses. 
  • Savings. Having some money saved is the best financial defense against disasters. Saving a little bit at a time can go a long way. A “rainy day” fund can help you invest in your family’s safety. 
  • Insurance. Obtain property (homeowners or renters), health, and life insurance if you do not have them.  
  • Inventory. Make an inventory of your possessions using photographs and/or videos of your belongings. 
  • Communication. Develop a Family Communication Plan that outlines how you will contact one another when a disaster strikes. 

University of Illinois Extension Plans Agriculture Careers Camp on Saturday, June 1st

Careers in Agriculture make up one of the largest industries and sources of long-term employment in the country, providing jobs for millions of Americans.  Biochemists, biophysicists, veterinarians and environmental engineers are just some of the jobs in the industry that employs nearly 23% of Illinois workers. To that end, University of Illinois Extension is proud to offer youth this agriculture careers exploratory experience on the campus of Black Hawk College East. The camp will take place on Saturday, June 1st from 9 am – 3:30 pm.  “The camp will be a great opportunity for teens and youth ages 12 - 18 years of age to plan their future career pathways by learning about a wide variety of careers in agriculture and talking with college instructors and industry professionals.,” said Jennifer Peterson, 4-H Educator with University of Illinois Extension.

 

Participants will be divided into groups by age and will get to attend interactive sessions led by Black Hawk College instructors and professionals in ag mechanics, animal science, agronomy, and engineering. "Our goal is that the campers will have a fun day learning about options available to them, exploring careers, visiting a local college, and meeting other teens with similar interests.," said Peterson, adding, “By having the camp at Black Hawk College East campus they will get to have a sense of what it feels like to go to college.” The sessions will take place in the Agriculture Center, Mechanics Lab, and Veterinary Sciences Center.   

 

Free bus transportation to Black Hawk College East in Galva, IL will be provided from the University of Illinois Extension offices in Milan, IL and Aledo, IL. Participants will check into the camp at 9 a.m., take two morning sessions, have a pizza party lunch and an afternoon session. The $10 fee includes lunch, t-shirt, snacks and activities (fee waivers are available for those in need.) Support for this camp is provided by CHS, the Illinois 4-H Foundation and Tyson Foods.

 

Sign up by May 22, session sizes are limited, so be sure to register early to reserve your spot. You can register online at U of I Extension's website: https://web.extension.illinois.edu/registration/?RegistrationID=20263 or call your county Extension office at (815) 875-2878 in Princeton, IL.

 

The Mission of University of Illinois Extension is to provide practical education you can trust to help people, businesses and communities solve problems, develop skills and build a better future. Visit our website at http://web.extension.illinois.edu/blmp/

If you have questions or need more information please call University of Illinois Extension, Bureau-LaSalle-Marshall-Putnam Unit at (815)875-2878. Extension offices are located in Princeton, Ottawa, Henry and in Oglesby on the IVCC campus.

 

MAY CALENDAR AT THE PRINCEON PUBLIC LIBRARY

Wed. May 1, 2019

6:30 p.m. Chicks with Sticks

Thurs.  May 2, 2019

6:30 p.m. Barry Cloud Music Program on Burl Ives

Sat. May 4, 2019

12:30 p.m. Wellness Workshop

Mon. May 6, 2019

6:30 p.m.  Monday Night Movie: True story of the Depression-era racehorse whose victories lifted the spirits of the nation.

Tues. May 7, 2019

10:30 a.m. Preschool Storytime and Craft

Tues. May 7, 2019

6:30 p.m. The Retirement and Investment University: educational & Informative presentation about investing for retirement presented by Christian Cyr from Cyr Financial.

Wed. May 8, 2019

1:00 p.m. I-Phone Camera Workshop

6:30 p.m. Widmark Wednesday

Thurs. May 9, 2019

6:30 p.m. Ottawa Rescue of 1859: Historic program by Heinz Suppan  about a runaway slave from 1859 who went through Ottawa, IL on his way to Canada.

Fri. May 10, 2019

4:00 p.m. K-3rd Grade Storytime

Sat. May 11, 2019

10:00 a.m. Medicare Supplement Information presented by Tim Burgess from Physicians Mutual

Mon. May 13, 2019

6:30 p.m. Monday Night Movie: The story of a bride-to-be trying to find her real father told using hit songs by the popular 1970s group ABBA.

Tues. May 14, 2019

10:30 a.m. Preschool Storytime and Craft

6:30 p.m. Quilts of Valor

Mon. May 20, 2019

6:30 p.m.  Monday Night Movie: An unlikely World War II platoon is tasked to rescue art masterpieces from Nazi thieves.

Tues. May 21, 2019

10:30 a.m. Preschool Storytime and Craft

6:30 p.m. U of I Extension program: “Backyard Birds” presented by Robert Chinn, Master Naturalist

Thurs. May 23, 2019

6:30 p.m. Princeton Rock Painters – Advanced signup is requested

Sat. May 25, 2019

10:00-3:00 p.m. Tractor Show:  Co-Sponsored by the Indian Valley Antique Club

Mon. May 27, 2019

CLOSED ALL DAY FOR MEMORIAL DAY

Tues. May 28, 2019

10:30 a.m. Preschool Storytime and Craft

6:30 p.m. Music Jam

 

Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois Annual Meeting to Honor Gold Award Girl Scouts, Volunteers, Girls, and Community Partners

Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois will host its Annual Meeting on Saturday, April 27, at Kishwaukee College in Malta, Illinois, from 9:30 a.m.–12 p.m. The event will honor the remarkable achievements of 16 local girls who have earned the highest award in Girl Scouts—the Girl Scout Gold Award.

 

The organization will present National Girl Scout Recognition Awards to local volunteers, including Volunteer of Excellence, Appreciation Pin, Honor Pin, President’s Award, Thanks Badge, Thanks Badge II, along with GSNI’s Hall of Fame Award. Community Partner Awards will be presented to Fraternal Order of the Eagles Club (FOE Club #679), Rockford IceHogs, and Roy Wilmering Scout Cabin. Local Girl Scout service units will also be lauded for accomplishments in Girl Scout membership and entrepreneurship program success!  

 

The event will include celebration of those local girls who have received Girl Scout scholarships and local troops that have achieved Honor Troop status within their communities. Girl Scout Membership pins will be presented from 5 years to 80 years. Graduating Girl Scouts are slated to close out the meeting in a Forever Green Bridging Ceremony where they will “cross the bridge” into adult Girl Scout membership.

 

New and returning board members for the organization will also be officially elected and rededicated to the Girl Scout Mission of building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. For more information, email customercare@girlscoutsni.org, call 844-GSNI-4-ME, or visit www.girlscoutsni.org.

 

GSNI 10th Anniversary: Rooted in History. Rising into the Future.

 

Backed by over 100 years of proven Girl Scout experience, four Girl Scout councils joined hands in 2009 and promised to propel girl leadership into the future together! In 2019, Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois will mark ten vibrant years of putting girls first at the center of all we do—from all-girl fun and adventure to unprecedented leadership opportunities found nowhere else. We have kept our promise to girls, and we always will!

 

Join us as we celebrate with lively family and girl events in local communities where it all began! Be part of our 10th Anniversary events and earn our special 10th Anniversary fun patch—Water, Land, Air! Girl Scouts Go Everywhere!

 

GSNI’s 10th Anniversary events include Over the Edge 4 Girl Scouts and Air Fair at Pheasant Run Resort in St. Charles, on June 1, 2019; the 15th Annual Thin Mint Sprint and Finish Line Fun at Harlem High School in Machesney Park, on September 21, 2019, and the 2nd Annual All-Girl and Family Fishing Derby and Water Whimsy at Rock Cut State Park in Loves Park on September 22. For more information, email customercare@girlscoutsni.org, call 844-GSNI-4-ME, or visit www.girlscoutsni.org.

 

Wondering Why Girl Scouts?

At Girl Scouts, girls are our first and only priority. And they always will be. See how girls prepare for leadership, adventure, and success at why.girlscouts.org. This dynamic digital experience showcases Girl Scouts as a powerhouse where girls develop key skills for a lifetime. Learn more at why.girlscouts.org today!

 

Girl Scouts don't just dream big; we take action. Are you ready to change the world with us? www.girlscouts.org/all

 

We’re Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois

We believe every girl can change the world. With us, Girl Scouts develop the independence and confidence to guide their own lives and build a better world. We put girls in the driver’s seat and encourage them to customize their own experience. With programs focused on the outdoors, career and interest exploration, travel and global community, and practical life skills, in addition to community service projects, every girl can unlock her full potential and be amazing!

 

We serve 16 counties including parts or all of Boone, Carroll, Cook, DeKalb, DuPage, Jo Daviess, Kane, Kendall, Lake, LaSalle, Lee, McHenry, Ogle, Stephenson, Whiteside, and Winnebago. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsni.org or call 844-GSNI-4-ME (844-476-4463).

 

Donation Leads To Nursing Program Upgrades

A gift from Southern California philanthropist Ralph Scriba has led to significant instructional enhancements within the Illinois Valley Community College nursing program.

 

Scriba’s $50,000 September donation led to the recent purchase of two patient simulators including “Nursing Anne” to replace the former “Meti man” manikin the department used for more than a decade.

 

“The differences between the manikin and the new simulator are tremendous,” said nursing lab instructor Laura Hodgson. They include:  

  • Wireless technology makes Nursing Anne much more life-like. The previous manikin had a large electrical cord.

  • Nursing Anne’s compressor is built-into her left thigh. The previous manikin was tethered to a very large compressor with a 25-foot hose. “I hid the compressor in the closet due to the noise and the size,” Hodgson said.

  • Nursing Anne has life-like moveable joints.

Along with the simulators from Laerdal Medical Corporation of Wappinger’s Falls, N.Y., the donation enabled upgrades on two older manikins to ‘Nursing Anne’ capabilities.  

“This increases the availability and frequency of simulation to more students,” said Director of Nursing Division Julie Hogue.

 

Hodgson noted the contribution also funded the purchase of several hospital-based scenarios to simulate real-life situations in a lab setting.

 

“Our students will gain critically important knowledge and training for years to come thanks to Mr. Scriba’s generosity,” she said.

 

Hogue said there are currently 133 students in the program with 163 expected to be enrolled next year – and all will use the simulators.

 

In January, Scriba donated an additional $50,000 to help the college launch a Medical Assistant program that will begin in January 2020. Over the past six years, Scriba, a 1951 LaSalle-Peru-Oglesby Junior College graduate, has donated $350,000.

 

“This gift is a perfect, quantifiable example of how Ralph enhances instruction for hundreds, if not thousands of students,” said IVCC President Jerry Corcoran.

 

Barry Cloyd Program May 2 at the Princeton Public Library

Singer/Songwriter Barry Cloyd will present a program on “Burl Ives, Midwestern Minstrel” at the Princeton Public Library Thursday, May 2 at 6:30 p.m. This original program will include stories and songs that give a taste of the history and music of this most amazing American folk music legend, Burl Icle Ivanhoe Ives.  Ives became known worldwide not only as the pre-eminent folk musician of the 40’s, 50’s & 60’s, but as an Academy Award winning actor, voice-over artist and all around star of stage, screen and vinyl. 

 

Barry Cloyd is an award-winning musician in his own right and brings the passion, drama and humor of Ives’ “up & down” career to audiences through tales of his life and times and plenty of those well-known and well-loved songs such as “Blue Tailed Fly,” “Wayfairing Stranger,” and many others.  Mr. Ives became, in the words of Carl Sandburg himself, “the mightiest ballad singer of this or any other century.”

Local Girl Scouts' Pottowatomie Service Unit to Host Ceremony for Highest Awards

Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois’ Pottowatomie Service Unit, which represents Girl Scouts in St. Charles and West Chicago, will host a ceremony presenting Girl Scout highest awards on Thursday, April 25, 6:45 p.m., at Norton Creek Elementary, 2033 Smith Road, in West Chicago. The ceremony will include recognition for Cassidy Beran and Taylor Keene, both of West Chicago, who earned Girl Scouting’s highest award—the Girl Scout Gold Award.

 

Beran’s Girl Scout Gold Award project helped younger generations face one of the things people fear the most—public speaking. By addressing this fear at an early age, she helped children develop public speaking skills and self-confidence. She formed and led a team which assisted her in implementing Gold & Blue public speaking workshops for third, fourth, and fifth grade students at Norton Creek Elementary. Beran wrote lesson plans for each workshop and shared them with the school district, so the project would be sustainable over the years.

 

Keene earned her Girl Scout Gold Award with a project designed to create awareness around the function of service dogs and their place in society. She partnered with VIP Service Dog Foundation, and a dog named Elf. Working with an advisor from the foundation, a dog trainer, the future owner of Elf, and others, Keene underwent eight months of service dog training. She trained with Elf everywhere, including grocery stores, shopping malls, school events, the library, and doctor's appointments. At each location, Keene educated others on service dogs. The family receiving Elf will benefit from changes in their son’s routine, safety, and happiness.

 

The ceremony will include recognition for local Girl Scouts who may have earned the Girl Scout Bronze Award, the highest award a Girl Scout Junior (grades 4–5) can earn, and the Girl Scout Silver Award, the highest award a Girl Scout Cadette (grade 6–8) can earn. Girls demonstrating leadership achievement through becoming a Program Aide or earning awards for Counselor-in-Training I, Counselor-in-Training II, or Volunteer-in-Training may also be recognized.

 

The event will feature a bridging ceremony where Girl Scouts walk across a bridge to signify their advancement to the next Girl Scout level along with a rededication ceremony where all Girl Scouts present will rededicate themselves to building and becoming girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place.

 

The Girl Scout Gold Award

 

The Girl Scout Gold Award is the highest award a Girl Scout can earn. It represents the highest achievement in Girl Scouting, recognizing girls who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through remarkable Take Action projects which have sustainable impact in their local and global communities. The award encourages girls to explore many facets of leadership today's society needs, including leadership of self, leadership through influence of peers, and leadership as a mentor/coach. Gold Award projects help girls develop project management skills, solve a community need, and are designed to be sustainable.

 

Girls can earn highest awards at various Girl Scout levels. Girl Scout Juniors (grades 4–5) can earn the Girl Scout Bronze Award while Girl Scout Cadettes (grades 6–8) can earn the Girl Scout Silver Award. Girl Scout Seniors and Ambassadors (grades 9–12) can earn the Girl Scout Gold Award.

 

The following seven steps are required to earn the Gold Award:  

  • Choose an issue: Use values and skills to identify a community issue you care about.

  • Investigate: Research everything about the issue.

  • Get Help: Invite others to support and take action with you.

  • Create a Plan: Create a project plan that achieves sustainable and measurable impact.

  • Present Your Plan/Get Feedback: Present your project plan to your Girl Scout council.

  • Take Action: Take the lead to carry out your plan.

  • Educate and Inspire: Share what you have experienced with others.

 

What makes the Girl Scout Gold Award unique? The Gold Award develops and tests multiple types of leadership. It asks girls to discover, connect, and take action to develop a sustainable solution to a community problem. The award requires 80 hours minimum of personal time investment in a project. It challenges girls to identify and work in a topic area for which they have a strong interest and passion.

 

Starting in 1916, the best and brightest have undertaken projects to improve their communities—and the world. The Golden Eaglet insignia, the highest award in Girl Scouts from 1916 to 1939, marked the beginning of a long tradition of recognizing the extraordinary efforts of extraordinary girls. From 1940 to 1963, the Curved Bar Award was the highest honor in Girl Scouts. From 1963 to 1980, the highest award was called First Class. Since 1980, the Gold Award has inspired girls to find the greatness inside themselves and share their ideas and passions with their communities!

 

GSNI 10th Anniversary: Rooted in History. Rising into the Future.

 

Backed by over 100 years of proven Girl Scout experience, four Girl Scout councils joined hands in 2009 and promised to propel girl leadership into the future together! In 2019, Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois will mark ten vibrant years of putting girls first at the center of all we do—from all-girl fun and adventure to unprecedented leadership opportunities found nowhere else. We have kept our promise to girls, and we always will!

 

Join us as we celebrate with lively family and girl events in local communities where it all began! Be part of our 10th Anniversary events and earn our special 10th Anniversary fun patch—Water, Land, Air! Girl Scouts Go Everywhere!

 

GSNI’s 10th Anniversary events include Over the Edge 4 Girl Scouts and Air Fair at Pheasant Run Resort in St. Charles, on June 1, 2019; the 15th Annual Thin Mint Sprint at Harlem High School in Machesney Park, on September 21, 2019, and the 2nd Annual All-Girl and Family Fishing Derby and Water Whimsy at Rock Cut State Park in Loves Park on September 22. For more information, email customercare@girlscoutsni.org, call 844-GSNI-4-ME, or visit www.girlscoutsni.org.

 

Wondering Why Girl Scouts?

 

At Girl Scouts, girls are our first and only priority. And they always will be. See how girls prepare for leadership, adventure, and success at why.girlscouts.org. This dynamic digital experience showcases Girl Scouts as a powerhouse where girls develop key skills for a lifetime. Learn more at why.girlscouts.org today!

 

Girl Scouts don't just dream big; we take action. Are you ready to change the world with us? www.girlscouts.org/all

 

We’re Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois

 

We believe every girl can change the world. With us, Girl Scouts develop the independence and confidence to guide their own lives and build a better world. We put girls in the driver’s seat and encourage them to customize their own experience. With programs focused on the outdoors, career and interest exploration, travel and global community, and practical life skills, in addition to community service projects, every girl can unlock her full potential and be amazing!

 

We serve 16 counties including parts or all of Boone, Carroll, Cook, DeKalb, DuPage, Jo Daviess, Kane, Kendall, Lake, LaSalle, Lee, McHenry, Ogle, Stephenson, Whiteside, and Winnebago. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsni.org or call 844-GSNI-4-ME (844-476-4463).

Landmark Camp Dean Shows Off New Amenities for Potential Summer Campers at Community Open House

Camp Dean, home to generations of Girl Scout campers and many local outdoor enthusiasts, is hosting an open house on Sunday, April 28, from 12:30–3:30 p.m., at 46W253 Camp Dean Road in Big Rock. The event will showcase improvements to the camp, including additions to the camp’s famous goat population, new crate-stacking activity area, archery and tomahawk throwing stations, a mud kitchen, and locations of new four-season cabins!

 

This free event is open to the public and will feature tours of new amenities at Camp Dean, fun hands-on camp activities (including roasting s’mores!), along with a GSNI Rope Runners regional competition, presented by Danfoss. All interested Girl Scouts, potential Girl Scouts, and their families can learn which summer camp session is a good fit for their camper. Camp staff will be on hand to answer questions and accept camp registrations during the event.

 

For more information, email customercare@girlscoutsni.org, call 844-GSNI-4-ME, or visit www.girlscoutsni.org.

 

Why Camp?

Camping is a great way for girls to explore leadership, build skills, and develop a deep appreciation for nature. Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois has a variety of facilities—from tents and cabins to year-round lodges—that are available for Girl Scouts to create their own unique camping experience or join us for council-sponsored camping events where we provide the activities and supplies. With new activities and amenities at all our camps, there is something for every girl!

 

GSNI 10th Anniversary: Rooted in History. Rising into the Future.

Backed by over 100 years of proven Girl Scout experience, four Girl Scout councils joined hands in 2009 and promised to propel girl leadership into the future together! In 2019, Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois will mark ten vibrant years of putting girls first at the center of all we do—from all-girl fun and adventure to unprecedented leadership opportunities found nowhere else. We have kept our promise to girls, and we always will!

 

Join us as we celebrate with lively family and girl events in local communities where it all began! Be part of our 10th Anniversary events and earn our special 10th Anniversary fun patch—Water, Land, Air! Girl Scouts Go Everywhere!

 

GSNI’s 10th Anniversary events include Over the Edge 4 Girl Scouts and Air Fair at Pheasant Run Resort in St. Charles, on June 1, 2019; the 15th Annual Thin Mint Sprint at Harlem High School in Machesney Park, on September 21, 2019, and the 2nd Annual All-Girl and Family Fishing Derby and Water Whimsy at Rock Cut State Park in Loves Park on September 22. For more information, email customercare@girlscoutsni.org, call 844-GSNI-4-ME, or visit www.girlscoutsni.org.

 

Wondering Why Girl Scouts?

At Girl Scouts, girls are our first and only priority. And they always will be. See how girls prepare for leadership, adventure, and success at why.girlscouts.org. This dynamic digital experience showcases Girl Scouts as a powerhouse where girls develop key skills for a lifetime. Learn more at why.girlscouts.org today!

 

Girl Scouts don't just dream big; we take action. Are you ready to change the world with us? www.girlscouts.org/all

 

We’re Girl Scouts of Northern Illinois

We believe every girl can change the world. With us, Girl Scouts develop the independence and confidence to guide their own lives and build a better world. We put girls in the driver’s seat and encourage them to customize their own experience. With programs focused on the outdoors, career and interest exploration, travel and global community, and practical life skills, in addition to community service projects, every girl can unlock her full potential and be amazing!

 

We serve 16 counties including parts or all of Boone, Carroll, Cook, DeKalb, DuPage, Jo Daviess, Kane, Kendall, Lake, LaSalle, Lee, McHenry, Ogle, Stephenson, Whiteside, and Winnebago. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit www.girlscoutsni.org or call 844-GSNI-4-ME (844-476-4463).

 

IVCC Hosts "The Struggle is Real" April 25

 Illinois Valley Community College hosts “The Struggle is Real,” a panel discussion about failure from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, April 25 in Rooms CTC124-125.

 

The free event features IVCC Dean of Learning Resources Dr. Patrice Hess, Assistant Director of Admissions, Records and Transfer Services Aseret Loveland and students Nic Bollis and Lillian Rodrigues sharing their own stories of failure and how they bounced back.

 

Disability Services Coordinator and instructor Tina Hardy said, “We hope attendees will come away with the idea that struggle, failure and disappointment are common, just part of being human.  Everyone experiences these things, no matter how put together others look on the outside or on social media.

 

“We’ll also discuss coping strategies and the resilience that’s needed to make it day-to-day in this world. Successful people aren’t perfect. They’ve just figured out ways to cope, adjust, and move forward,” she added. 

 

Students are preparing for final exams, determining what college they will transfer to and applying for jobs in the workforce. Hardy has advice if things do not work out how they initially hoped.

 

“Acknowledge the disappointment. Take ownership of the things that you did and did not do to get to the point where you are. Get moving and make a Plan B. It’s the rare person whose Plan A has worked out start to finish.

 

“Seek help from your family, friends, and all the great resource people at IVCC as you move forward. As the quote on my wall says, ‘Failure is not the opposite of success, it is part of success.’”

Sen. Rezin Bill To Help Prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Passes Senate

Unsafe sleep environments are often a large contributor to infant deaths labeled as Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) said State Senator Sue Rezin (R-Morris), who is chief sponsor of legislation that puts stricter requirements in place following an investigation where a child died suddenly and unexpectedly. Senate Bill 1568 passed the Senate last week on Wednesday, April 10.

 

SB 1568 would require coroners to conduct an autopsy following the investigation as well as list any environmental factors that may have contributed to the child’s death. The bill would also require the Department of Public Health to publish current data that it receives from coroner reports so that the public has access to reporting concerning SIDS.

 

“Too often, infant deaths are being ruled as SIDS even when there are unsafe factors present at the scene where the infant passed,” said Sen. Rezin. “By just putting SIDS on the death certificate, potentially valuable information is being left out that could help prevent infant deaths in the future.”

 

The legislation was brought to Sen. Rezin by a constituent, Ashley Lamps, who lost her son in 2013 to SIDS. Lamps now runs a foundation that advocates for SIDS awareness and the use of safe sleep practices.

 

SB 1568 now heads to the House of Representatives for consideration.

Sen. Weaver On Panel Discussing Proposed Changes to Income Tax System

State Sen. Chuck Weaver (R-Peoria) was one of four lawmakers who talked with Chicago leaders April 15 about the Constitutional Amendment proposed by Gov. J.B. Pritzker to fundamentally change the state’s flat rate income tax to a progressive rate income tax.

 

Sen. Weaver joined State Sen. Elgie Sims (D-Chicago), State Rep. David McSweeney (R-Cary) and State Rep. Will Guzzardi (D-Chicago) in the City Club of Chicago’s panel discussion about “Graduated Income Tax: What does it mean for Illinois?”

 

Weaver says the progressive income tax proposal is more like an introductory cable offer to get people to vote to remove the flat tax limits, and he believes the end result will be higher taxes on middle-income families.

 

“Illinois has highest tax rates in the country. We have a serious spending problem, not a revenue problem. The progressive tax makes it even easier for Illinois to tax middle-income families,” Weaver said. “Illinois needs the discipline that the flat tax in the current Constitution offers.”

 

The 37th District Senator also warned that state government’s continued reliance on tax-and-spend policies, as well as its past track record in overspending, will continue to drive individuals and businesses from Illinois.

 

“I believe changing the Constitution and making it easier to raise taxes will only encourage more people and jobs to leave our state. It is happening downstate already,” said Weaver.

 

On April 10, the majority party in the Senate advanced out of committee a proposed progressive income tax that provides no protections for middle-income families and would give those lawmakers the ability to raise taxes in the future.

 

Senate Joint Resolution Constitutional Amendment #1 (SJRCA #1) will place a referendum on the 2020 General Election ballot asking voters if they support moving Illinois from a flat tax to a progressive tax structure. And while the measure advancing in the Senate deals with putting the question on the ballot, there is no legislation that would limit future tax increases.

 

The City Club of Chicago is a non-profit, non-partisan organization whose members include prominent business, civic and government leaders in Chicago. Founded in 1903, it is the longest-running civic forum in Chicago.

IVCC Wind Ensemble in Concert May 5

Illinois Valley Community College’s Wind Ensemble will be in concert at 3 p.m. Sunday, May 5 in the Dr. Mary Margaret Weeg Cultural Centre.

 

    The performance includes “Manhattan Beach March” and “The Fairest of the Fair” by John Philip Sousa/Frederick Fennel, “Poet and Peasant Overture” by Franz von Suppe/Kenneth Singleton, “Eternal Father, Strong to Save” by Claude T. Smith, “Incantation and Dance” by John Barnes Chance, “Danse Celestiale” by Robert Sheldon and “Folk Festival” from the motion picture “The Gadfly” by Dmitri Shostakovich/Donald Hunsberger.

Conducted by Gene Montgomery, the ensemble includes IVCC students, local and regional music educators and community members dedicated to the promotion of quality wind and percussion music.

 

The concert is also a farewell to conductor and part-time music instructor Montgomery, who retires May 18 after over 30 years with IVCC.

 

In his retirement letter, he recalled, “It was approximately 29 or 30 years ago that I was sitting in the office of Dr. Sam Rogal, Dean of what was then the Humanities/Fine Arts Division. We were lamenting the fact there had been a several year hiatus of having an instrumental performing group at IVCC, and he asked me if I knew of anyone capable of re-instating the ensemble.

 

“Although I was still a full-time public school instrumental and choral teacher, I quickly answered that I would be more than happy to accept the challenge,” Montgomery wrote. “Since that time, the IVCC Wind Ensemble has been widely respected among music educators in Illinois.”

 

Dean of Humanities, Fine Arts and Social Sciences Robyn Schiffman said, “Gene has grown the Wind Ensemble over the years to represent the best of community and student musicians. He has brought a level of class and sophistication to the musical choices and performances. His dedication will be missed and very hard to replace.”

 

The concert is free and the public is invited to attend.

IVCH Occupational Health Nurses now NIOSH-certified

The four nurses who staff the occupational health department at Illinois Valley Community Hospital have all completed training to become certified spirometry technicians and can now administer pulmonary function tests to workers whose jobs may expose them to airborne crystalline silica, which can be a factor in the development of lung disease and other serious illnesses.

 

 A regulation from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires workers who risk exposure to respirable crystalline silica to be to be tested periodically to determine how well their lungs are working.  OSHA says the testing must be done by spirometry technicians who have current certificates from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

 

IVCH occupational health nurses Deb Tostovarsnik, APN, FNP-C, COHN; Sue Walters, BSN; Stephanie Spanos, RN; and Barb Bianchi, RN; are all NIOSH-certified, according to Dr. Joel Leifheit, medical director of the department.  Tostovarsnik, a certified occupational health nurse, and Dr. Leifheit are also both on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration registry of certified medical examiners, meaning they can administer physical examinations to truck and bus drivers.

 

Dr. Leifheit said the four IVCH nurses are also certified by the Council for Accreditation on Occupational Hearing Conservation (CAOHC) to perform hearing tests on workers whose jobs place them in noisy environments.  They can also administer Department of Transportation-mandated drug and alcohol tests. For more information, call 815-780-3202.

 

Enbridge donates another $5,000 for welding scholarships

Enbridge recently made its fourth $5,000 donation to the Illinois Valley Community College Foundation for welding scholarships for students who live along the pipeline and have an interest in working in the oil and gas pipeline industry.

 

Full- or part-time second-year welding students who live in Marseilles, Naplate, Ottawa, Grand Ridge, Streator or Serena are eligible for the $1,000 Enbridge Pipeline Industry Awareness Scholarships.

 

    “Enbridge has given significant help to our students pursuing welding careers in the high-demand, high-pay pipeline industry,” said IVCC President Jerry Corcoran who noted the corporation has now donated $20,000 to IVCC since 2014.

 

Enbridge Inc. is North America’s premier energy infrastructure company with strategic business platforms that include an extensive network of crude oil, liquids and natural gas pipelines, regulated natural gas distribution utilities and renewable power generation.

 

For information on IVCC’s welding program, call Dean of Workforce Development Shane Lange at (815) 224-0219.

 

IVCC hosts a viewing of "Audrie & Daisy" April 30

Illinois Valley Community College’s Student Services and Human Services Organization along with Safe Journeys host a viewing of the film “Audrie & Daisy” at noon Tuesday, April 30 in Room C316.

 

The film follows the journey of two sexual assault survivors, the community response and the devastating impact of social media.

 

Snacks and beverages are provided and a discussion with staff from Safe Journeys will follow the film. The public is invited to attend.

 

IVCC hosts "Spring Reflect and Renew" April 29

Illinois Valley Community College’s Student Services and Human Services Organization along with Safe Journeys host “Spring Reflect and Renew” from 1 to 3 p.m. Monday, April 29 in Room C325-326.

 

This free event is a collaborative discussion with staff, students, faculty and community members about how to support sexual violence survivors and create a culture free from sexual violence.

 

Strategies for stress relief, mindfulness techniques and self-care giveaways are also part of the event. The public is invited to attend.

 

Perry Memorial Hospital Leaders Showcased at the State Capitol a Quality Improvement Initiative That Advances Care and Reduces Costs

A Perry Memorial Hospital initiative to improving diabetes care and outcomes through
education was on display in the State Capitol on April 3 as part of the Illinois Health and Hospital Association’s (IHA) Quality Advocacy Showcase. Perry Memorial Hospital leaders Debora May-Rickard, Chief Nursing Officer and Celia Goers, Director of Care Management met with legislators to share how the initiative has benefited patients, families and communities while reducing healthcare costs.

 

Perry Memorial Hospital leaders were among over 100 hospital and health system leaders from across Illinois who met with legislators about their efforts to improve patient care and safety. In sum, 90 hospitals and health systems showcased their improvement projects at the event.

 

“I found this event to be very enlightening and productive,” said Debora May-Rickard, Chief Nursing Officer. “I was able to connect with our legislators to provide my stance on pending healthcare legislation. Secondly, the ability to connect with 98 other Illinois facilities and discuss quality strategy and share options on common needs and quality of patient care was excellent.”

 

Rickard met with Rep. Dan Swanson during the event. Rickard said, “I found Rep. Swanson to be very engaged and informed of our current health care needs and discussions. He shared interesting information to support the future growth of our community and healthcare.”
With a focus on Diabetes, Perry Memorial Hospital’s project trained a diabetes self-education
management coordinator, implemented “Living Well and Feeling Well” education classes and offers nutritional therapy with Perry licenses dieticians. The hospital invested $6.2 in training and marketing realizing a cost savings of $160,000 in reduced admissions. For the patients, families and communities, Perry Memorial Hospital serves, the project:


• Improves diabetes self-management
• Promotes preventive health and lifestyle changes
• Increases access to local resources

 

IHA’s Quality Advocacy Showcase, in its fourth year, visually demonstrates the work of physicians, nurses, quality improvement leaders and hospital administrators to develop and implement solutions to improve care. IHA produced one 30-by-42-inch poster per hospital or health system project for the event.


“The Showcase gives hospital leaders and frontline staff an important opportunity to share their efforts to advance quality care,” said IHA President and CEO A.J. Wilhelmi. “It’s essential that policymakers and elected officials see how Illinois hospitals are doing more to serve their patients and communities— through innovation and practical strategies that improve outcomes.”

SciFest at IVCC April 19

SciFest is back at Illinois Valley Community College from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, April 19 in the gym.

 

The annual event hosted by IVCC’s CHEM/STEM Club is free and features science experiments including fluidized sand bed, a giant Newton’s Cradle, Ruben’s Tube and a screen printer.

 

Hands-on experiments and demonstrations in chemistry, biology, geology and physics include Dr. Matthew Johll testing his strength against the imploding barrel.  

 

The event draws hundreds of young students and parents each year. For information, contact Johll at matthew.johll@gmail.com or call (815) 224-0468.

 

IVCC Choir Concert and Voice Student Recital May 6

The Illinois Valley Community College choir will be in concert with voice student recitals at 7 p.m. Monday, May 6 in the Dr. Mary Margaret Weeg Cultural Centre.

 

The choir will be singing “Wade in the Water,” “Because All Men Are Brothers,” “El Ritmo de la Noche,” “It Had to be You” and more.

 

Choir and voice students perform under the direction of instructor Jenilyn Roether. The performance is free and the public is welcome.

 

Varicose Vein Screening

Dr. Mark Williams will be hosting a free varicose vein screening at Perry Memorial Hospital in Princeton on Friday, April 26 and Wednesday, May 1.   Dr. Mark Williams said, “Varicose veins are not always a cosmetic issue. The valves in your leg veins may need repair due to venous disease.”

 

To raise awareness of the disease and evaluate treatments, Dr. Williams will hold two screenings for a minimally invasive procedure called VNUS ClosureFast.  Venous disease is common among people who have a family history of varicose veins, work in a profession that involves standing for longs hours, have had multiple pregnancies, or are obese.  If you have leg symptoms including fatigue, swelling, discoloration, and even skin ulcerations, then this screening is for you. If conditions are left untreated, symptoms may worsen with time.

 

A benefit of this procedure is a short work to recovery time, resuming normal activity within a day or two.  There is an easy solution, VNUS ClosureFast. The FREE vein screenings will be held April 26, from 3:30 to 5:30 and May 1, from 9:30 to 11:30 in Perry’s General Surgery Clinic located in the Medical Office Building, Suite 205.  Call 815-872-9491 to schedule a screening appointment or register online at perrymemorial.org/vnus.

 

April Board Report IVCC

Illinois Valley Community College will pilot a Transfer Academy this fall allowing dual credit high school students to be released in the afternoon for classes at Ottawa Center, board members learned Thursday.

 

 The initiative will allow high school students to complete all general education core courses over four semesters – with the possibility a few summer courses may also be needed.

 

    “The schedule at Ottawa Center will be well-suited to students pursuing studies in humanities, social sciences and those uncertain what their major will be,” said Vice President for Academic Affairs Deborah Anderson.

 

As with all IVCC dual credit courses, students will receive a 25 percent tuition discount and those qualifying for the federal Free and Reduced Lunch program will pay just the $5 registration fee.  

 

“I anticipate this will bring a new demographic to the Ottawa Center in the afternoons as students are released to take classes there,” said Anderson. “I am also optimistic the experience of the college campus will attract more students to IVCC after high school graduation.”

 

IVCC is also developing a plan to allow dual credit students seeking STEM-related careers to attend afternoon classes on main campus.

 

The board also learned IVCC’s 60-credit Associate of Applied Science degree in Cybersecurity has been approved by the Illinois Community College Board.

 

Beginning this fall, the program will address a surge in demand for skilled workers in information security and will cross-train IT staff to protect networks from cyber threats. Courses include Managing Information Security, Digital Forensics, Security+, Cybersecurity Scripting, Computer Ethics and Ethical Hacking.

 

A 2017 study by the Center for Cyber Safety and Education estimated there will be a 1.8 million worker gap in the information security workforce worldwide by 2022. Security analysts earn a median hourly wage of $45.26 with an annual salary of $94,134, according to the Illinois Department of Employment Security (2018).

 

In other business, the board learned part-time music instructor and Wind Ensemble conductor Gene Montgomery will retire May 18.

 

In his retirement letter, Montgomery recalled, “It was approximately 29 or 30 years ago that I was sitting in the office of Dr. Sam Rogal, Dean of what was then the Humanities/Fine Arts Division. We were lamenting the fact there had been a several year hiatus of having an instrumental performing group at IVCC, and he asked me if I knew of anyone capable of re-instating the ensemble.

 

“Although I was still a full-time public school instrumental and choral teacher, I quickly answered that I would be more than happy to accept the challenge,” Montgomery wrote. “Since that time, the IVCC Wind Ensemble has been widely respected among music educators in Illinois.”

 

    In other action, the board approved:

  • Sabbatical leave for the fall semester for Lauri Carey, a 19-year biology and horticulture instructor. During the sabbatical, Carey will work to improve curriculum and instructional methods in biology.

  • The retirement of 13-year welding instructor Paul Leadingham effective June 30.

  • The $1,469,000 bid of Dodson Plumbing, Heating & AC of Pontiac for the Building C Air Handler Unit/Chiller replacement.

  • Purchase of 71 PCs from Dell Inc. for $47,831 for rooms E215, CTC119 and B213.

  • Three-year licensing from CDW of Malwarebytes Anti-Malware/Anti-Virus software for $24,000. The cloud-based software manages and protects college devices, even off-campus.

The board also learned:

  • La Moille High School will begin a Career Start program in fall 2019 allowing its students to enroll in IVCC Career and Technical Education courses as part of their high school coursework.

  • IVCC nominated The Results Companies of Streator for the Illinois Community College Trustees Association 2019 Business/Industry Partnership Award. The customer service and sales call center has worked with IVCC since 2016 to provide its employees continuing education and college credit toward a customer experience and sales certificate. To date, 108 employees have completed the program and another 41 are now enrolled.

  • Final cost of the Dr. Mary Margaret Weeg Cultural Centre accessibility upgrade was $638,530, about $230,000 under budget. New seating and ADA-compliant ramps to each side of the stage were among the enhancements. The project was partially paid for from a bequest of more than $620,000 from the estate of Walter Durley and Hazel Marie Boyle.

  • Final cost of the exterior stairs upgrade was $138,652, about $95,000 under budget.

  • A new three-year lease has been approved with the Economic Development Corporation of North Central Illinois for $4,284 per year. EDCNCI will move into E building rooms 309, 311 and 312.

  • The retirements of Financial Aid Reconciliation and Compliance Specialist Lorri Foockle effective April 19, longtime facilities groundskeeper Mike Minnick on April 30 and textbook buyer Jackie Carlson on June 28.

  • Recent Student Government Association elections resulted in Matthew Klein of Peru winning as student trustee, Kaitlyn Ruppert of La Salle as SGA president, Lillian Moskalewicz of La Salle as vice president, Cierra Espinoza of Oglesby as treasurer, Andrea Medina of La Salle as SGA secretary, Haley Fittanto of West Brooklyn as sophomore representative, and Megan Brooker of Granville and Karlee Arjes of Peru as sophomore programming board members.

  • Admissions’ March 26 Explore IVCC event “was well planned and executed thanks to the fine work of Quintin Overocker, Aseret Loveland and Gracelyn Quesse,” said IVCC President Jerry Corcoran. “A long list of faculty and staff played a role in making the event worthwhile for prospective students.”

  • The Foundation’s April 3 Giving Day III raised over $29,000.

  • Project Success, a federally-funded TRiO program serving students who are first-generation, low-income or with disabilities, scored a perfect 15 on the Department of Education’s annual performance report for how well a program meets its objectives. “Project Success exceeded all rates in persistence, good academic standing, associate degree or certificate attainment, and transfers to a 4-year institution. We had funding to serve 165 students and ended up serving 179,” said Corcoran.

  • The IVCC board and chair Jane Goetz hosted the Illinois Community College Trustees Association Northwest Region April 3. Computer aided design instructor Dorene Data presented on the college’s MIMIC (Making Industry Meaningful in College) program and on an initiative to increase the number of women in technology fields.

  • The nursing honor society Alpha Delta Nu inducted 16 members Monday.

  • IVCC sophomores Lillian Rodrigues of Mendota and Nic Bollis of Peru were recognized for extraordinary academic achievements at Tuesday’s All-Illinois Phi Theta Kappa banquet in Springfield. As Illinois’ New Century Transfer Scholar, Rodrigues earned a $2,250 scholarship. Both she and Bollis will attend Northern Illinois University next fall. Rodrigues plans a career as a physician’s assistant, Bollis as a pediatric cardiologist.

Weaver to host Town Hall in Princeton April 18

State Sen. Chuck Weaver (R-Peoria) is hosting a Town Hall April 18 at the High School in Princeton.

The Town Hall is scheduled to start at 6:00 p.m. in the Auditorium at the High School at 103 S. Euclid Avenue.

 

“Our Town Hall allows Princeton area residents to come together and learn more about what is happening in state and local governments, and share their thoughts on legislative and community matters,” Weaver said. “It is also an opportunity for the Weaver Team to get to know you better as a community and as individuals, listen to your ideas, and help with your concerns if we can.”

 

For more information, call 309-693-4921.

 

 

School Spirit at IVCC

Donald Mills of La Salle sports a vintage La Salle-Peru High School letterman jacket at
Illinois Valley Community College today. The semi-retired Mills, currently taking an Excel
course through IVCC’s Continuing Education Center, said he takes a class whenever possible.
Not an LP alum, Mills said the jacket is a gift from a friend and a favorite of his.

SENATE WEEK IN REVIEW: April 8-12, 2019

A controversial graduated income tax plan was advanced during the week, with Democrat lawmakers and state officials claiming it is time to “let the people vote,” even though they will not allow similar votes on other issues such as term limits, pension reform and fair maps.  

In other action, the Senate spent long hours on the floor passing bills to the House that range from measures to help secure classrooms in the event of an armed intruder, address the teacher shortage, and work to prevent deadly ethylene oxide leaks.

 

Graduated income tax offers no protections for middle-income families

 

On April 10, Democrat members on the Senate Executive Committee advanced a proposed graduated income tax that provides no protections for middle-income families and would give those lawmakers the ability to raise taxes in the future.

Senate Joint Constitutional Amendment (SJRCA) 1 would place a referendum on the 2020 General Election ballot asking voters if they support moving Illinois from a flat tax to a graduated tax structure.

 

Senate Republican Leader Bill Brady, who like his Senate Republican colleagues opposes a graduated income tax, noted that the crafters of Illinois’ current constitution chose a flat tax, which the people of Illinois embraced, because the flat tax provides middle-income families better protections from politicians.

 

And while the measure advancing in the Senate deals with putting the question on the ballot, there is no measure showing what future tax rates would be if it’s adopted.

In March, Gov. J.B. Pritzker announced his proposed rates; however, Pritzker’s rates are yet to be introduced in legislative form.  When testifying before the Senate Executive Committee, Deputy Gov. Dan Hynes was unable to give middle-income taxpayers any assurance that these rates would remain level in coming years.

 

In hopes of providing some protections for Illinois families, Senate Republican lawmakers have offered SJRCA 12 to require a two-thirds super-majority vote in both chambers of the General Assembly to increase any tax or fee.  Currently, legislators only need a simple majority to pass a tax increase or to implement a new tax.

 

Senate Republicans are also calling on the Administration to let the people have their voices heard on other important issues, such as term limits, pension reform and fair maps.  

 

Improving school safety

 

The Senate passed legislation during the week aimed at letting Illinois schools utilize an affordable and easy-to-use option for locking classrooms to protect students in case of an intruder or other threat to students’ safety.

Senate Bill 1371 allows school districts to use door locking mechanisms that attach to the door and are lockable and unlockable from the inside of the classroom without a key.  The mechanisms must be unlockable from the outside by a key or tool, and police and fire departments would be informed of the locations of the locks.

The legislation offers a way for teachers and students to lock their classroom securely from the inside in the event of an emergency.

 

Addressing teacher shortage

 

Legislation aimed at helping to relieve the current teacher shortage also passed out of the Senate during the week.

Senate Bill 1809 aims to help students enter the teaching field, by expanding the eligibility of MAP grant recipients to include students who have already received bachelor degrees or have 135 credit hours, but are seeking to earn their teaching certificate through an educator preparation program.

The bill also requires that the recipients must teach in Illinois for three out of the next five years, and states that they can only be eligible to receive the grant for one academic year.

 

Targeting Sterigenics crisis

 

Members of the Senate unanimously passed legislation during the week that would protect Illinois residents, like those Willowbrook residents impacted by Sterigenics, from the hidden dangers of ethylene oxide.

Senate Bill 1854 prohibits any facilities from having any fugitive emissions of ethylene oxide six months after it takes effect.  The IEPA will be required to study ethylene oxide levels throughout the state to set a baseline for the levels.

In addition, it would subject facilities to stack testing, which tests emissions at all release points at least once per year.  The facilities would also be subject to ambient air testing, at random, four times per year. Any facility that emits ethylene oxide at a level higher than standards set in the federal Clean Air Act or by the IEPA would be required to immediately cease operations until sufficient changes are made to reduce the emissions below both federal and state standards.

 

Senate Bill 1852 also cleared the Senate during the week.  The legislation states that the case of an ethylene oxide leak, facilities are required to notify local government officials and affected property owners within 2,500 feet of the leak.

 

Senator Rezin's Youth Advisory Council Brings Local High Schoolers to Springfield

 Dozens of high school students from across State Senator Sue Rezin’s 38th Senate District traveled to Springfield on April 11 to participate in her Youth Advisory Council (YAC).

 

Sen. Rezin’s bi-annual YAC gives students a unique, up-close and hands-on perspective of what it would be like to work in various roles in state government.

 

“I first met these students during the first installment of my Youth Advisory Council back in the fall, and I continue to be amazed by their level of engagement and interest,” said Sen. Rezin. “This event gives students a chance to really dig into public policy. It’s important that we, as legislators, engage with our young people through the legislative process because they are the leaders of our future.”

 

Sen. Rezin hosted the all-day Youth Advisory Council at the Capitol, where she talked with high school students from St. Bede Academy, Coal City, Morris, Wilmington, LaSalle-Peru, Ottawa, and Putnam County High Schools about Illinois government and how the Legislature operates.

 

The students also toured the Capitol, watched Senate Floor action from the gallery, and were able to hear from a wide variety of speakers, including Chicago mayor-elect Lori Lightfoot.

 

The students later participated in a mock committee hearing, where they were broken up into groups representing the key players in the realm of public policy including senators, lobbyists, and concerned citizens.

 

“I host this event every year, and every year I’m just as impressed as the last about how informed these kids are in the legislative process,” said Sen. Rezin. “It’s refreshing to see the passion they have on issues that matter to them.”

Archives:

2019-04 | 2019-03 | 2019-02